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Frame Square advice on tightening the saw blade

Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

BarbH

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Apr 15, 2015
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10
Location
Marshall Minnesota
Hello. I am wondering how those of you who use a Frame Square saw tighten the blade. I currently use an adjustable crescent wrench and a small vice, but I am worried about getting the nut tight enough.

When I take the blade off, I can use a block of wood to keep the blade from rotating, but to tighten the nut I have no such option. Any advice on this would be appreciated.
 

Larry Peterson

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JFeig

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The threaded arbors on an electric saw are self tightening by design as the arbor rotates. If they were not, the nuts would have a tendency to come off.
 

Andrew Lenz Jr.

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Santa Cruz, Calif.
Slip a flat head standard screwdriver between the blade teeth and "anchor" the screwdriver against the tabletop. If you have a long flat piece of metal, you could suspend that across the access opening and between the blade teeth.

Curious, Barb, how are you using the small vise? Pinching the blade?

I've never seen a blade nut randomly come loose on our Framesquare.

Andrew
 

neilframer

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The threaded arbors on an electric saw are self tightening by design as the arbor rotates. If they were not, the nuts would have a tendency to come off.
Yes!
And if the nuts come off, the blade might be flying at your head like a killer frisbee.....:eek:
The saws that I am familiar with all have reverse threads on the single blade models and on dual blade saws, the left side is reverse thread and the right side is regular thread.
That way, they will always tighten on rotation and not loosen so you don't have to over-tighten the blade, it will tighten itself.

I'm not sure which side of the blade the arbor and nut is on with the Frame square.
That's probably the only saw that I have rarely used.
If the nut is on the right side, then it is a regular thread.
If the nut is on the left side, then it is a left-handed or reverse thread.

Regular thread is "lefty loose, righty tight".
Reverse threads or left handed threads are "lefty tight and righty loose".;)
 
Last edited:
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MarkyW

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
1,074
Location
Nanticoke, PA
Yeah, I use a wood block when loosening and also to tighten. When tightening, you have to put the block into the opening through the access panel to the blade and then pull back on the table to jam the blade into the wood block while your other hand turns the wrench to tighten. Tough job.

Your idea of using a vise made me think that using vise grips might be a good idea. The curved jaw won't grab the saw teeth or hurt them, it will grab the flat part of the blade. A possibility I will have to try.
 

Joe B

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Larry Peterson

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Larry, do you need a copy of the Frame Square 4000 & 4200 Manual for your manual page? If you do let me know and I will email you a PDF. Joe

Yes I do. You can send them to larry at thepaperframer dot com
 

Scout

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Oct 14, 2016
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Looks like you guys have covered the process pretty well... I'll add that I have used the "jam" method and the "Vise grips with wooden blocks" method, both worked sufficiently enough.

BTW: Larry, thank you for your page of manuals and resources, it has been a tremendous source of quality information for me! THANK YOU! :)

-Scott
 
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IFGL

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Joined
Jun 1, 2012
Messages
3,751
Location
.
Yes!
And if the nuts come off, the blade might be flying at your head like a killer frisbee.....:eek:
The saws that I am familiar with all have reverse threads on the single blade models and on dual blade saws, the left side is reverse thread and the right side is regular thread.
That way, they will always tighten on rotation and not loosen so you don't have to over-tighten the blade, it will tighten itself.

I'm not sure which side of the blade the arbor and nut is on with the Frame square.
That's probably the only saw that I have rarely used.
If the nut is on the right side, then it is a regular thread.
If the nut is on the left side, then it is a left-handed or reverse thread.

Regular thread is "lefty loose, righty tight".
Reverse threads or left handed threads are "lefty tight and righty loose".;)
I never quite got that saying, as you face a bolt or screw it only goes right at the top of the turn, at the bottom it's going left, I suppose if I turned my self with the bolt then I get it because I would be turning to the right, am I thinking about this too much?
 

IFGL

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Isn't there a locking mechanism like a hole in the shaft behind the blade in which to insert a tool?
 

David Waldmann

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I never quite got that saying, as you face a bolt or screw it only goes right at the top of the turn, at the bottom it's going left, I suppose if I turned my self with the bolt then I get it because I would be turning to the right, am I thinking about this too much?

Obviously not (that's assuming you don't yet have your Masters in bolt turning).
 
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