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Film shooters

UzZx32QU

Forum Founder
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Joined
Nov 29, 1999
Messages
3,798
Anyone still shooting film. If so what format negative are you using.

I seem to take a couple roll of TRI-x out of my freezer each year take a few shots and never develop them. I guess because of the work and cost to mix the chemicals for a couple of rolls, unless I feel I really got a keeper image, it just not worth the effort.

framer
 

nikodeumus

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
447
This weekend I was thinking about dusting off my old Minolta film camera.
I have about 8-10 rolls of mixed 35mm film rolls in storage.
I used to work in photo labs back in the days before digital.
Never had to mix my own chemicals etc., always had access to all that at work.

unless I feel I really got a keeper image, it just not worth the effort.
One way to keep costs down if using a lab is to just ask them to process the negatives with no prints (or ask for just a contact sheet).
Then examine your negs with a loupe, or viewer device, or if you have the ability to scan them and view on PC for evaluation.
Pick only the ones that seem to be worth having the lab print them, especially enlargements.

In the past, I've had prints from slides/negatives processed by both the traditional optical enlarging methods and by modern Hi-Res scans and digital prints.
The old methods still make better quality prints in my opinion, sharper and "cleaner" looking edge definition, etc.
The downside is obvious, it's less efficient, more costly, take alot of time, and you don't have nearly the amount of adjustment control as compared to digital processing.
The other problem is it hard to find places that still do optical enlargements. It's another art form that has mostly been lost to technological advancements.

On a side note: After my landlady's husband passed away I helped her catalog and sell off a bunch of his film processing equipment, enlarger, timers, etc. Now I wish I had bought them myself. :shrug:
 

UzZx32QU

Forum Founder
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Joined
Nov 29, 1999
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That the other part. I have a whole DR with a 6x7 omega enlarger with a couple of Schneider lenses but it been boxed up for 15 years. I also have a Epson 1680 scanner with a transparency unit. It does a great job with medium format B&W negatives --> digital images.
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
11,377
Tri-X.
Haven't heard that name in thirty years. Is that ISO 400?
 

nikodeumus

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
447
That the other part. I have a whole DR with a 6x7 omega enlarger with a couple of Schneider lenses but it been boxed up for 15 years. I also have a Epson 1680 scanner with a transparency unit. It does a great job with medium format B&W negatives --> digital images.
Here's what I've done...
  • Have the messy processing done by a lab with a contact sheet.
  • It's hard to judge image quality of negs in reversal, so use your scanner to make viewable "proofs" with the contact sheet as a reference. It'll help eliminate the "stinkers" from the decent shots.
  • Then get 4x6 or 5x7 small proofs of only the best few.
  • Use those real "proofs" for colour quality. The lab can make colour adjustments to your request. I found that Fuji colour film is cooler in colour tone than Kodak. So once I got a "proof" made, I could look at the image and think "That needs a little more yellow to offset the cool blue hue, that will make the greens of the trees look more natural", etc.
  • A good lab will work with you to get the best colours possible. A "cheap and fast" lab won't do any colour correction, that' why they are cheap. I've worked at both.
  • Depending on the kind printing or enlargement you may want to get, your film images are most likely going to be converted to digital anyways.
Again it all depends on the lab's set-up. I haven't worked in that industry for quite a while.
Back then, the films were chemically processed in the usual manner. Either by hand in tumblers or with a neg processing machine.

The imaging phase was then a hybrid of light transmission through the negatives onto an extremely high res imaging chip.
Then the image is transferred using lasers to "expose" the image onto the unprocessed photo paper.
Then the photo paper is processed through the typical silver chemical treatment and output as a finished print.
As I said, it's been about 20 years, so my memory of the process is probably a little flawed.

Yes, all this takes much more time than nearly instant digital photography. But it's kind of part of the charm of film shooting.
It's a process, learning it and getting good at it is just like any other art form. I think that my years of learning film photography served to install good shooting habits, and really understanding photography.
These days there are a lot of people claiming to be "professional" photographers who couldn't explain ISO, shutter speed, or figure out how to determine appropriate f-stops if their lives depended on it.

On the other hand, that's why technologies change and improve. So we don't HAVE to do all that difficult technical stuff, and can concentrate on the "artistic" side of photography.
Personally, I like the technical stuff too.
 
Presto Frame & Moudling 800-431-1622

Freddy L

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
9
35m, 120, large format from 4x5 to 8x10. all black and white. tend to go with black wood frames and white windows (which white depends on how print is toned). for some reason, I think I read that this is West Coast style ? and all wet
printed gelatin silver
 

wvframer

Humble Picture Framer
Forum Support Team
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Oct 9, 2007
Messages
1,526
Any guidance on where to find a lab to process film?
 

Freddy L

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
9
Any guidance on where to find a lab to process film?
Google would be my first choice for finding a lab. If you shoot colour slides (E-6), Prauss up in Rochester comes highly recommended. Depends on where you live and whether you feel comfortable shipping film. b/w is easy peasy to develop, colour (C-41) has a few more chemicals and higher temps, but same mechanics.
 

DVieau2

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Oct 26, 2004
Messages
8,994
Used them for decades. Former employee is a now production manager.
See Pro Lab services for B & W and Slides.
 

wvframer

Humble Picture Framer
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Oct 9, 2007
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1,526
Thanks!
 
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