fillet troubles

dmbtig

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Posts
3
From
Northeast US
Hey group, I'm new at framing and need GOOD advice. I had the opportunity to do framing through a big box store and thought I'd try it out. The "training" was whirl-wind and they only touch on the basic topics and expect you to fill in the gaps.

One problem is cutting fillets on our table-top cutter. I get good fits but the fillets seem to chip or flake either on the cutting or fitting. We don't have matching touch up paint and nothing is really close in color to the finish that we sell.

What's the best way to cut fillets to minimize chipping? Would a light spray of polyurethane work? Sorry for the naivete but any advice would be welcome. thanks dmb
 

Cliff Wilson

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Vendor
Joined
May 14, 2002
Posts
4,665
From
Worcester, MA
1) Get your blades sharpened. That's the most likely cause.

2) Get some better touch up.

3) Cut them a little long and use a sander to clean them up.

P.S. Some mouldings are just going to be prone to chipping. Take them off the wall.
 

Roxanne Langley

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 14, 2000
Posts
178
From
Woodlands, TX
Along with getting the blades sharpened you might look very close and make sure they don't have a small nick taken out, sometimes that will cause the chipping.

The mouldings that are prone to chipping, the LJ X0466 (small gold bull lip), I cut a smidgen larger and literally shave it down to minimize the chipping.

Roxanne
 

dmbtig

Grumbler in Training
Thread starter
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Posts
3
From
Northeast US
Thanks for the replies. I tend to cut longer and shave them down. I thought that might have been the problem. The blades are rather new. Haven't cut alot of fillets so far so I would think they'd be OK but will change blades to be sure. We don't sharpen them just reorder new ones. Also there is n sanding equipment. Thanks again, dmb
 

Baer Charlton

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
May 24, 2004
Posts
21,029
From
On FB
Invest in a magnifying glass and check the edge for small dents.

A small investment in a sharpening & honing set up for those little blades is really worth the effort.

Spray glue a 600grit wet/dry emory cloth to a sheet of glass and sharpen with a little WD40. Then wipe/wash off and hone with a bit of water.

The oil will sharpen to a satin look, and the water will give you a mirror.

Sharpening skate you can get from Rockler or Woodcraft. Comes with instructions.
 
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