Fillet Headaches

Joose

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Jun 9, 2004
Posts
5
Location
Tampa, Florida
I'm currently using a mitre saw to cut my fillets and lately I'm having less success in getting a perfect mitre. The front of the fillets abutt perfectly in the corners, but after I've taped the fillet into the mat, the front of the mitre cut gaps enough that I need to putty it. It is the fault of the saw? or is it the handling of the fillet?
All assistance is welcome!!!!
 
Try gluing the fillet "frame" together before hand. That will tell you if it will work or your cuts are off. You also end up with perfect joints that STAY perfect.

It also might be time to invest the $200 in a fillet chopper.
 
You could also invest a few more bucks in a miter sander. The one from ITW AMP, not a power sander from Sears or Home Depot. Those things are made to be adjustable and are a bit sloppy. The $500 job from ITW AMP is made strictly for 45 degrees and is built like a tank.

The other thing I like about it is that you can get double use out of it, as it is perfect for super-fine tuning cuts on mouldings.
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Thanks! I'd thought about replacing the saw with a fillet chopper, but hadn't thought that a sander was an option. As for brands of these items, any concensus on which is best and which are dogs?
 
If you can't afford the sander - use a cheapo from Home Depot etc (like Dave warned you against) but tighten it up real tight & make yourself a better (longer) mitre and you can make it work. dave is right tho - if ya got the dough - buy a good one.
 
Originally posted by FramerDave:
You could also invest a few more bucks in a miter sander. The $500 job from ITW AMP is made strictly for 45 degrees and is built like a tank.

The other thing I like about it is, it is perfect for super-fine tuning cuts on mouldings.
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now if only the chop services would invest.... :D
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Some chop services do invest in them. West Coast/CMI Moulding in San Diego uses them. They are not exactly "built like a tank" They use bushings instead of bearings and under high usage, they wear out quickly. For the average custom framing business they are just dandy. For high production, not so swell.

This is common in our industry, manufacturers are always looking for ways to keep the price down. Apparently custom framers are not known for spending big bucks on equipment.

John
 
we had a mitre sander----until someone in the shop dropped it and bent the axle! now it's useless. it is built like a tank, but its own weight crashing to the floor can certainly bend the disc/axle apparatus. so find a good, outta-the-way spot and clamp it or bolt it down.
 
Dana
I would cry if my sander broke...they are such beautiful creatures. Could that person that hurt the sander be punished badly for their horrifying mistake for me?

Patrick Leeland
 
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