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Favorite Saw Blade/Brand?

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Rachael

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Jan 27, 2017
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Greenfield, Massachusetts
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I feel like there is probably a sticky on this, or at least a topic that everyone except this noob knows where to find. But alas, after 10 pages of search results, no joy. So if you have an opinion, or can point me to a useful thread, I'd like to know what you think about chop saw blades. Specifically, what brands do you love/hate and do you think the ATBR or ATB pattern is better for framing work? I'm using an Amana A.G.E. series 100 tooth ATBR 4+1 now, but I need a 2nd blade. I've been looking at the Forrest blades and they seem to have a stellar reputation, but at their prices, I want to make sure I pick the best possible option. Right now, I'm only doing wood mouldings and ordering my metal frames as chops. But if I could bring the metal in-house as well, without sacrificing the quality of my wood miters, I definitely would. Thanks for your thoughts!
 

neilframer

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Welcome to the Grumble, Rachael.

I highly recommend Quinn saw blades.
Their prices are good and the quality is excellent.
http://www.quinnsaw.com

80 or 100 tooth blades, we have both and we use Quinn for sharpening service.
I'm sure that others will agree.
 

Joe B

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Check out W.D. Quinn Saw Co. That's where I get my blade sharpened and new blades from. Work great on my saw.
 

Larry Peterson

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Ditto that on Quinn blades
 
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ArtMechanics

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Nov 29, 2012
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90
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Along with the others here I'm recommending you try the W.D. Quinn blades. And not just because they support and are active on the grumble. They really are good blades for the price they charge. I've also used the Amana A.G.E. and I didn't like them. The Quinn blades will be a step up from these. I own 4 of their blades.

Now please allow me to nerd out on blades for a minute haha. For wood most pro miter blades will be ATB+1 alternating top bevel and one flat. For other things like aluminum you'll get triple chip. There are variations on these like high alternating top bevel and alternating face.

Other than top geometry, the rake angle will affect how the blades cut too. A + number will be more aggressive and tend to pull into the work piece. A - number will be easier to control but might not feed as easily.

Other than the Quinn blades my next most used brand is Tenryu. They offer alternating face blades ATAFR or ATAF+1 which is kind of unique. The only issue I've had with the Tenryu alternating face is that when they are newly sharp they can grab on the back stroke if you bring your blade up too fast.

Much of this will be preference, and experience. You'll have to try it out and see if it works in your shop, on your materials.

I would not recommend getting a blade with a colored coating since some times it will rub off on your work. Plus its kind of a marketing gimmick. If it was a good blade it wouldn't need a fancy color for people to notice. Also, Forrest seems overpriced. Has anyone bought these? I can't imagine they'd really be that much of an advantage.
 

Rachael

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Thanks for the nerding out! I dig the tech talk :). I just had a good conversation with Bill at Quinn, and I'm totally sold. And I'm really glad to hear that the Quinn worked better for you than the Amana - I don't have a lot of data points yet, but I wasn't that impressed with the Amana and I'm glad to hear I wasn't totally out in left field.

As long as we're nerding out about blades, do you guys tend to clean your blades a lot? How often? And how often do you find yourself sharpening? I realize both will depend enormously on your volume, but I'm curious what people find for their operations.

Thanks again for the feedback everyone, so helpful!
 
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Fsimard

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Québec city
I'm really happy with the results of my Forrest Chopmaster blade.

It's by far the best blade I ever owned, but I never tried the Quinn. They also seems to be excellent.
 

monkey

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
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Jun 20, 2011
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403
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Westchester, NY
Tenryu and Kanefusa from WD Quinn are great blades. Whichever blade you choose I highly recommend you have a quality shop re-sharpen your blades, otherwise it's kind of a waste of money. when I first started about 10 years ago another frame shop recommend a local guy to me for blade sharpening. Really nice guy but after about 2 years I had to switch sharpeners. Cuts weren't always perfect and blades would quickly dull. He often would have to re-sharpen, and everything time they re-sharpen it reduces the life of the saw blade.

I do clean my blades between sharpening and I find it does help. I also coat my blades with dry lubricant between cuts (not on every cut). So far my favorite dry lube is the WD-40 dry lube with PTFE. The WD-40 dry lube actually cost less then some of the other dry lubes I've tried and works better. I love this stuff for other things around the shop as well.

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IFGL

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Does the lube not affect the adhesion of the glue on mitres or are you only cutting metal?
 

monkey

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I use it on wood moulding. It leave no residue on my moulding. It's a dry lube, I spray it on let it dry than cut my moulding.
 
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neilframer

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Thanks for all the replies! For those with 12" blades, 80 tooth or 100 tooth?

We have already talked about Quinn blades.
Quinn has an 80 tooth blade that can perform just as well as the 100 tooth blade.
I always believed in the past that the more teeth, the better.
Since I wasn't sure, we have both 80 and 100 tooth blades and I haven't really seen any difference in performance.

It might depend on your particular situation and what types of mouldings you cut.
There is some money saved with the 80 tooth over the 100 tooth, but it's not huge and again, your situation might dictate which is better.

I suggest you call Quinn and discuss your situation and needs and I know that they can steer you in the right direction for you.
Watch how they sharpen and inspect the blades...
 

IFGL

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Thanks for all the replies! For those with 12" blades, 80 tooth or 100 tooth?
Mine are 96 tooth :eek:, and triple chip, we get a very clean cut but only do wood, not sure what you need for aluminium.

Also make sure there's no movement or vibration on your saw this will also affect cuts.
 

Rachael

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Thread starter
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Jan 27, 2017
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Location
Greenfield, Massachusetts
Mine are 96 tooth :eek:, and triple chip, we get a very clean cut but only do wood, not sure what you need for aluminium.

Also make sure there's no movement or vibration on your saw this will also affect cuts.

That's awesome, thanks! I'm surprised the TCG grind works well for you with wood - I always thought that grind was better for aluminum. So much yet to learn!
 
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ArtMechanics

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That's the one thing, I don't like my Quinn 80 tooth blade with aluminum, it tends to send offcuts flying so I stopped using it for metal.

But you don't have the issue with the 100 tooth?

I could be wrong but when cutting hardwoods less teeth will help prevent burning. My next set will probably be an 80 tooth.
 

monkey

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
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I like 80 TH for hardwood and big beefy frames, 100 TH for medium to soft woods. 80 TH have bigger gullets and better at clearing the wood chips (just my impression).

My 80 TH has reached is service life and I only have 100 TH blades. With my 100 TH, whenever I cut the Larson Juhl 613677. Solid Maple frame 3/4" x 1-5/8", not big a big moulding. It some times burns even with newly sharpen blades.

I need to get another set of 80 TH blades.
 

GreyDrakkon

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But you don't have the issue with the 100 tooth?

I could be wrong but when cutting hardwoods less teeth will help prevent burning. My next set will probably be an 80 tooth.

I actually like using my chopper for hardwoods, but the 80 tooth blade does a good job of it too. Metals are the only thing I have a problem with on it, and only at the very end where it will suddenly snag the bottom of the "loose" rail and fling it. This is usually only an issue when at the end of a rail when the "off" side is too short to clamp down, but I don't like that happening at all and it makes me leery of cutting any metal with it.
 

dpframing

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
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Mar 27, 2011
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I've had good luck with UltraMitre blades. I bought 4- 100T blades last year from them and it felt like I was cutting air. But I do use Quinn to sharpen them.
 

ArtMechanics

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I actually like using my chopper for hardwoods, but the 80 tooth blade does a good job of it too. Metals are the only thing I have a problem with on it, and only at the very end where it will suddenly snag the bottom of the "loose" rail and fling it. This is usually only an issue when at the end of a rail when the "off" side is too short to clamp down, but I don't like that happening at all and it makes me leery of cutting any metal with it.

I know exactly what your talking about now. I've also had this happen. You could try holding down the off cut with a push sick. That's how I avoid it.

I haven't used ultramitre in ten years or so. I thought their blades we really thin. I guess that's good for some things but I prefer full kerf. My experience wasn't terrible but ultimately I didn't buy them again. I would be willing to try them again though if the price was better.
 
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