"fade resistant" ink

printmaker

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Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada
This question(s) comes up from time.

We do know about the various nylon/felt-tipped, pigmented ink, fine markers available. And yes, we do know that UV glass would help substantially with this, but:

- When signing a document to be framed, is there a pigmented/archival quality BALL POINT pen available to use, whereby the signature won't fade out with time?

- Also, might one assume that "regular" black ink will, generally, stand up better than blue?

Thank you, as per usual, in advance!
 

Ron Eggers

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When I have customer that wants to have a mat signed - say, at a wedding reception - I send along some Pigma Micron pens, made by Sakura Color Products in Japan.

They are "micro pigment ink for waterproof and fade proof fine lines . . . an archival ink for use in acid-free environments."

If they want a more formal look, I give them only black pens. If they're looking for funky, I send an assortment. Presumably, the black will hold up better than, say, red.

These are getting easier to find because of the popularity of scrap booking. Forgive me, but Wal-Mart carries them.

These are not exactly ball-point, BTW, so maybe I haven't helped you one little bit.
 

printmaker

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Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada
Thanks for your (always) kind and prompt response, Ron.

I am, indeed, aware of Pigma pens, as well as a variety of nylon/felt tipped clones. These are decent products (I think), and we have both
used and recommended them in the past, having come across no better alternative.

They work gr8, when they work. However, I'm (more than) a bit concerned about the "iffy" shelf life. These tend to dry out at the most inopportune times and, even purchasing a brand new pen does not guarantee dependability. We've always suggested having extra of this kind of pen available "just in case".

Back at the ranch, I was hoping (against hope) that, if there were a BALL POINT variety of these pens, this might provide a more dependable alternative with greater shelf life ... one that we could purchase ourselves, in bulk, and give to our customers when appropriate.

Thanks again!
 

Emily

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Beresford, SD
Just as "conservation framing" can be undefined and overused, so also anything "acid free". One thing I've found helpful is to maintain a good relationship with a "Creative Memories" dealer. I often have need for good quality pens and markers, and for papers to re-print poems and eulogies on for framing. Creative Memories is a company that seems to understand acid-free and lignin-free importance. And since I am a one-man shop, so to speak, I don't have time to go window-shopping in Sioux Falls very much. It's nice to be able to call someone who I know is reputable and say, "Hey bub, whatcha got in...."

This, by the way, is not a plug for Creative Memories necessarily. I'm just going on my experiences.
 

Ron Eggers

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Wisconsin
Turn blue in about two weeks, and disappear in about four.

Unless you get it somewhere you don't want it. THEN it's permanent.
 

Kit

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Rochester, MN
This isn't going to help but I can't resist an opportunity to bemoan the demise of fountain pens and India ink.

Fountain pens have class, they have style, they are what is needed if you are signing a document for framing.

Also - and this is no small point in their favor - it is impossible to dot an 'i' with a smiley face when writing with a fountain pen.

Okay, I'm done harumphing now.

Kit
 

sharonm

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Pennsylvania
Originally posted by Steven6095:
What would the good old' Sharpie marker do?
It'll fade. I had a Flyers Jersey autographed back in the early 90's. Stupid me wore the darn thing, and because of washing, all of the signatures (which were signed with Sharpies) faded. Only Ron Hextall's and Rick Tocchet's are still visible.
faintthud.gif
 

GUMBY GCF

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In Memorium

Rest In Peace



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oHIo
Faber Castell makes a pen that is pigmented also it is called a PITT pen. Any good art supply dealer should be able to supply you or order them for you. They come in 4 tip sizes and black, brown, and sanguine (terra cotta). Seem to be more reliable. As with any pen made with plastic, since plastic breathes, make sure you are not getting something that has been sitting on the warehouse self for a year.
 

Jim Miller

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Originally posted by Ron Eggers:
When I have customer that wants to have a mat signed - say, at a wedding reception - I send along some Pigma Micron pens, made by Sakura Color Products in Japan...
I second Ron's recommendation.

As a calligrapher for about 30 years, I've used a lot of different pens and inks. As far as I know, all ball point pen inks are dyed, not pigmented. As such, they will fade. Pigmented inks last longer.

Most fountain pen 'India' inks aren't 'real' india ink; just good quality dyed ink. If your fountain pen has a refillable reservoir, you can fill it with genuine, bottled India ink, but be sure to clean it thoroughly & refill at least once a week. Some India inks are corrosive enough to eat up the nib. And if your pen dries up with real India ink in it, it is probably ruined.

I've had Pigma Micron pens around for several years without drying out. Just make sure they're tightly capped. If left open, they surely will dry out in, ohhh, about fifteen mnutes.

I keep various colors and sizes, and seal them in shrink film. That helps to keep air out, and it also assures the customer that it's a new pen. Or, sometimes you can buy them in vacu-formed retail packages.

Rather than looking for something that won't dry out, just get the Pigma Micron pens and keep them fresh.
 

artist

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Uniontown, OH USA
I've used "Sharpies" for years, with good results on remarking mats on my paintings and on mats used for signing as the one for my daughters wedding. Earlier I did some pan & ink drawings with a cheaper pen and the faded in about 6 months,
 
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