fabric covered mats (again)

sheritex

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Jul 23, 2003
Posts
138
Location
tyler, texas
Was reading the thread from a few days ago. I have been cleaning my part of the shop all day, so my mind is kinda tired. Just want to see if I have this right.

1. cut window mat
2, apply the acrylic medium with a small roller
to mat and bevel
3. let dry 15 minutes or so
4. lay fabric over mat
5. put in heat press for 5 minutes or so at 160??
6. use tacking iron to do the bevel??
7. I know how to finish back and work corners

I've done 3 of these in the last week or so and I love them...only thing is I have used Pro 77 and I hate that stuff...have you ever tried spraying that stuff outside and the wind blowing20-25 miles an hour...goes everywhere...plus you have to move pretty fast to get the fabric positioned. And if you are doing a fairly large mat...you need an extra person to help, or at least I do.

Anyway...I hope i've got this right...Please advise
Thanks,
Sherry
 
We have mounted fabric to mats for several years with a vacuum press w/o heat. After cutting the mat, spray vacuum adhesive to the front of the mat and place the fabric over the mat. Place the cutout over the fabric and put them in the press for about 5 minutes. Remove, trim and finish wrapping.

Jack cee
 
Sherry, that is exactly the way I did it and it worked great.

I just recieved the adhesive and samples from Frank's and plan on picking Baer's brain in Vegas! With questions not a toothpick. (opps, sorry, couldn't resist. Just had a big discussion with someone about eating monkey brains!)
 
"Just had a big discussion with someone about eating monkey brains!)"

What in the name of all that's good are you doing over there on the other side of the lake? Monkey Brains?

EEEEWWWWWWEEEE!
 
Happy Birthday Harry! In many places in the far east it is a delicacy! It is not uncommon to find restaurants with holes in the center of the table for the head to show through.

Sorry about the frankenthread Sherry!

But, the technique you described works!
 
I'm sorry, I didn't realize that Worcester was in the Far East. I thought it was to the west of me. Wait a minute, I guess that would make it about as far east of me as you could get without being here again would't it?

But then again, I was never very good at geology. I mean, geography.

Sherry, please accept my appologies as well. I will add, that though I have not personaly tried the method Cliff described, it sounds like a winner.

After all, despite the fact that he eats monkey brains, Cliff is a little smarter than your average bear. (not to be confused with "Bear").

Good Luck, Harry
 
Back to the original topic ... Sherry, you can use the iron to release and reposition prior to the final wrap. I used release paper when using the iron, but I guess you don't have to if you are sure your iron is clean. And, the temp I used was 165. Not that 5 degrees really matters. That's just where I set for Speedmount, so I used the same temp.
 
thanks guys for all your help...now the monkey brains......believe I can live without those things....we eat cows in Texas!!!!!!!
May have to let loose of some money and get Baers new release. Looks like it may tell me everything I ever wanted to know about fabric wrapping mats.
HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!!!!!!
Sherry
 
You can set the temperature?
Who knew...?

I think my press is stuck at 180 and I have yet to have any reason to change it...

I apply the goop and then cut the mat. I don't want any blobs hangin' around on the edge of the bevel. For a 4-ply mat, I have never found it necessary to put the goop on the bevel. I just sort of pull it around to the back of the mat and ATG it. I also pull the extra fabric around to the outside edge of the mat.

I put the tiniest dab of PVA glue on the tip of an awl and work it into the corners of the bevels from the back to 'tighten' it up a bit and tame any flyaways.

For an 8 ply (or more) mat, I apply the gloss medium sparingly to the bevel. I then put the fall out back into the mat ON TOP of the fabric and that is usually enough for a crispy, clean bevel. I will touch up any areas with the tacking iron.

My tacking iron is ALWAYS dirty. I use a scrap of fabric sometimes as a 'barrier'.

edie the busyandhappy goddess
 
Back
Top