Encapsulation question

deaconsbench

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United has a roll of Mylar which is .003 mil thick. In your experience, is this thick enough to give a flat, smooth surface? Or is there a thicker mil which works better - a more professional appearance? I work with antique and vintage paper collectibles. Being new to the industry, I don't have many supplier contacts. All leads are appreciated. Thank You!
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wpfay

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That's the weight I use. Same weight you can get from the other preservation supply companies, only less expensive from UMS.

(it's either 3 mil or .003"... .003 mil would be .00003" and way to thin to use for encapsulation)
 

Jim Miller

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Actually, what we get today is Melinex 516. It is the clear polyester film replacement for Mylar-D, which hasn't been made since 2001. I buy it from United on the rolls, too.

3-mil is plenty thick enough for a good sandwich (encapsulation) mount. Thicker films will be easier to use without showing creases from the handling, but thinner films are less visible in the finished mount. And for folded mounts (for other things, like books) the thinner film conforms better & creases more sharply.

Be sure to use 3M #889 double-sided tape to hold your sheets together. It is a very thin polyester tape with a good acrylic adhesive, and its bond strength increases over time. It is non-migrating, acid free and most suitable for the purpose. Do not attempt to do the job with ATG or other double-sided tapes. Most tapes other than 3M #889 will fail soon or cause problems later.

deaconsbench, have you learned how to create these mounts properly, or have you just figured it out on your own? If the latter, be careful. They're not as simple as they look.
 

deaconsbench

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Jim, I don't know how to properly create a mount. I was going to 'frame' the item in double-sided (standard 3M acid-free) tape (leaving approx. 1/8" space), and roll out the top, using much like a roller pin style - bottom to top. Hoping this would create a flat mount. I'm all ears as to how to do this correctly. I'll get the tape you specify. And, THANK YOU for the guidance.
 

Jim Miller

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You seem to have the right idea.

An encapsulation mount supports a document in three ways:
1. Pressure from having the two sheets' convex sides facing together. All clear film has curvature. Make sure your two sheets have their convex sides facing together, like this )( , and not like this () , in order to create gentle overall pressure in the mount. The sheets lay flatter, too.

2. The tape strips holding the clear film sheets together near the paper's edges create a pinching action. If the tape strips are more than 1/4" away from the edges, the piching action is reduced. If the tape strips are closer than 1/8", there is danger that the document could contact the adhesive.

3. Static charge from the plastic. This increases & decreases with environmental changes, but it is usually a factor in holding the paper in place.

When you place the double-sided tape strips at least 1/8" away from the item and at no more than 1/4" away, there will be a see-through perimeter within the mat opening, and the strips can be covered by the mat.

Be sure to burnish the tape strips thoroughly to activate the bond. To avoid scratching the clear film, use a piece of release paper or a scrap of film under the burnisher.

Some parchment and paper items, especially if thick, heavy, and creased, might have more texture than an encapsulation mount can accommodate. The mount will have a flattening effect, but it may not be enough to overpower heavy wrinkles or sharp creases.

Shameless plug: Take my class, "Clear Film Mounting with Melinex/Mylar-D", which is offered at PPFA chapter meetings and other venues.
 

deaconsbench

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Jim, thank you very much! I printed out your instructions and will study them later today. I certainly appreciate your expertise.
 

Sister

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Great info., Jim. I, too, printed this off. I love this place--where else can you get such valuable lessons just for the looking.
 

B. Newman

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Originally posted by Jim Miller:


Shameless plug: Take my class, "Clear Film Mounting with Melinex/Mylar-D", which is offered at PPFA chapter meetings and other venues.

Your next opportunity to take this class is this coming Saturday (July 23rd) in Franklin, KY.

The KY/TN Chapter of the PPFA will be offering the class which will be hosted by FrameKing. The cost is $50.00.

Give me a call or e-mail me for more information.


Betty
 

B. Newman

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CORRECTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Man, am I out of it! (I was posting from memory, which at this late date is almost non-existant!)

First of all, the class is at Florence, KY this weekend. And Jim will be teaching "Preservation Mounting Techniques", which covers clear film only briefly and includes starch paste hinging & other alternatives.

sorry guys. Our older son is getting married this weekend and I just about wish they had eloped! :eek:

Thank goodness I am the mother of the groom and not the bride!

Betty
 
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