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dust within the picture

Airpag Corner, packing solution for frame shipping

gunzlinger

Grumbler
Joined
Jun 27, 2003
Messages
18
Location
Rapid City, SD
I've been framing pictures for a couple of months now and have had a lot of success at it. My problem is this, on about every 5th picture I see that some dust somehow seems to get on the mat or picture after it has been put together. This drives me nuts! After cleaning the glass and mat I put the frame/picture together in a seperate room in which I believe there is no dust. Obviously I am wrong. Could I please get as much help as possible?!!

Thanks
 

Less

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 23, 2002
Messages
2,707
Location
ZZ
Hi Gun, excuse Less for a second.

Ok Charles, I'm holdin' back.

Hi Gun, you'll find lots of great advice here on this subject, but Less just doesn't look that hard anymore.

One out of five ain't bad.
 

Walt C

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jan 11, 2003
Messages
722
Location
Gillette, WY
Hi Gunzlinger:

Welcome to the Grumble and the Framing Business.

If you happen to find a remedy for this problem, patent it before you tell anyone. ;)

We're in the Eastridge Mall. Stop in next time you're in Casper.
 

Hobbes03

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Dec 4, 2001
Messages
1,727
Location
Torrington, Connecticut, USA
Gun,

Welcome to the grumble. Ditto what Less said, you will find lots of great advice here. Use the search function to see what's been covered on this subject. I'm afraid I had to chuckle reading your post because it may be something you'll just need to get used to. I can assemble a frame package in an hermetically sealed room, and a dust booger will inevitably show up after the dust cover and hanging hardware has been put on, after having inspected for stray specks about 10 times and swearing that none could be found. It is just a test of how much patience you possess. I agree with Less, one out of five is not bad at all! There have been various tips for keeping the dust to a minimum, some of the obvious are cleaning as much as possible. But one I remember is, instead of blowing your assembly bench off with an air hose, vacuum it instead, much less chance of particles floating around waiting to land somewhere, most likely on your mat.

-Mike.
 

Ron Eggers

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 6, 2001
Messages
16,932
Location
Wisconsin
Welcome to The Grumble, Gunzlinger. You WILL find some helpful folks here and you'll find a few that were raised by muskrats and don't know how to act around humans.

Less, the question was a broad one, but did you think it was unreasonable? Or did someone drop you on your head when you were a newby and make you bitter? Save the smart-ass remarks for those of us who have been around long enough to know that you're harmless and sometimes even lucid. Either help the guy or leave him alone.

(Man, that McDonald's spray lacquer packs a wallop, doesn't it?)
 
Airpag Corner, packing solution for frame shipping

FrameItEtc

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Jan 6, 1999
Messages
114
Location
USA
Gunzlingers:

I very rarely have ANY problems with dust AFTER i put something together. Here is what I do:

1. Clean glass on both sides.

2. Before putting glass over artwork, or photo, or whatever, I use a blowgun with about 80 lbs. of pressure (hold the gun about 6 inches away).

3. After the glass is put on the artwork, I look for any dust that might have snuck in (lol)... if there is, i tilt the glass away from the artwork and use the glowgun again.

4. I blow off any dust that might be on the frame or in the rabbit of the frame.

5. The picture frame is placed over the glass and art and held in place and THEN turned upside down to asemble the framejob.

:mad: If you have a bad day, start again with step #1.

(Important: An air filter/moisture trap should be used on the air line 6-12 feet from the
tip of the blowgun. I must do that down here mainly because of the high humidity...)

Good Luck.
 

Hobbes03

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Dec 4, 2001
Messages
1,727
Location
Torrington, Connecticut, USA
Gun,

Something that I have found that works for me, keep a long narrow strip of mylar or other very thin plastic material on hand. If after you put the glass on the mat, and you find one of those specks, lift the glass very slightly and slip the mylar strip under until it reaches the speck. Usually there is enough static built up that the speck clings to the mylar, then slowly pull it out. This way, you avoid lifting the glass off altogether exposing it to even more dust. I also sometimes put a very small piece of 3M 810 tape at the end which helps. Be careful if you use an airhose, I've done that once or twice, and if the artwork is thin, you are in danger of ripping it with the forced air.
One other thing I always do that is fodder for debate among alot of framers, I seal the frame package with 810 tape. I wrap around all four edges, covering the edges of the glass, window mat, mounting mat and foam backer or whatever backing you are using. 1/8" max goes over the front edge of the glass to remain hidden behind the lip of the moulding. To me this helps keep dust out especially when using the point driver. The down side is when you find the rogue dust speck after you have sealed the package. I am sure others will tell you of their own tricks.

Good luck!

-Mike.
 

framah

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Ok... I use a anti-static brush which helps keep the possibility of the D.B. (dust bunny) from jumping back onto the art. I clean one side of the glass and the right after brushing and blowing the art clean (hopefully), I set the art upright at the back edge of the glass as it sits on the table. Then I bring the glass up to the art and set the whole thing down with the glass now on the art with the just cleaned side against the art. At this point, theorectically, no more DB's can get onto the art. I then clean the glass and put the frame onto the package on the table. I slide the package slightly off the table so I can get my fingers under the package to hold it all together while turning it over. I then pin a couple of times per side just to hold it and lift it up to look for the little buggers. No buggers, I then finish pinning it together. Rarely, do I have to reopen to remove DB's. It was how I was taught and it has worked for me for the last ten years. :D :D
 

Hamster

True Grumbler
Joined
Jan 10, 2003
Messages
99
Location
Los Angeles, CA
Gunz,

When I first started framing, I would always find I would have a problem with little white specks that would somehow materialize even after I meticulously cleaned a piece. Then I started noticing that it would mostly occur in the mornings. It used to drive me crazy :eek:

After a couple of months, I finally figured it out....it was my deoderant falling through my sleeve!!! DERRRR!!! I had to change to a less "flaky" brand.

Just food(?) for thought.

Ham
 
Airpag Corner, packing solution for frame shipping

Reynard

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Nov 30, 2001
Messages
559
Location
Ayr,Ayrshire,Scotland
i tend to clean the glass both sides and polish it too.The I sort of put the glass in place over the work and then drop it on from the last couple of inches and it seems to suck out any dust in there.Its worked not bad for all the time I have been framing.I don,t normally get much bother with dust under the glass unless its a particularly scabby old picture or an old frame.

good luck
 

tnframer408

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Messages
1,506
Location
Knoxville TN
Echo what FrameIT said. Assemble package right sdie up, altho my compressed air for the project is around 20 psi 'cause I don't want to disturb things.

One addition, though: we use surgical gloves--actually blue chemo gloves courtesy of my son--to handle the glass so we don't have to wash it usually.

Rarely get dust bunnies, UNLESS we're messing with those black fabric mats. also clean the work area daily to reduce dust.
 

PurplePerson1

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
1,990
Location
Mansfield, Ohio
I usually use the blower on blowable things, but that mylar strip idea sounds great. I am going to try it when I get back to work.

I had a static nightmare shadow box a couple days ago and the mylar would have solved the problem, I think.
 

Don Denier

Grumbler
Joined
Sep 2, 2002
Messages
34
Location
Ocean Shores, WA
The part about keeping the area clean should be taken seriously -- really seriously. I have taken a cheap 20-inch box fan and taped a 20-inch furnace filter to the back (so that the air is pulled through the filter). Position it to blow away from the work area and run that fan almost all the time. Amazing how much crud it takes out of the air. It minimizes the dust available to get trapped under the glass after assembly -- doesn't eliminate all -- just minimizes.

A thought -- will one of the mat board manufacturers please develop a black suede with uniformly distributed white specks -- those irregular white specks drive me . . . .
 

Walt C

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jan 11, 2003
Messages
722
Location
Gillette, WY
That fan with a filter is a great idea.


Thanks!!!
 
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stud d

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
Messages
2,382
Location
next too you
there is no such thing as a dust free room in the real world. fantasyland maybe???it is an everyday occurrance. get your own way down, then it will be easier and easier to get rid of dust. once you have your system of assembly down you should see your faults quickly. it takes everyone a bit in the beginning. don't hesitate to go to a framef friend in your area and see what they do...if they are nice they will let you in to the secret framers dust codes. only a few know about these codes and have the means to make it happen...or you can just pray the customer does not notice?
deniss
 

Ron Eggers

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 6, 2001
Messages
16,932
Location
Wisconsin
Here is a link to some information about how to create a dust-free room (in the real world.)

I didn't read the whole thing, but I'm pretty sure the dog isn't allowed in there.
 

stud d

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
Messages
2,382
Location
next too you
ok so i stand to be corrected. not a problem with admitting i have made a booboo. i think the idea of a dust free room, but it seems very hard to keep up with. anywasy i think we learn tricks over time to keep dust out one way or another.

maybe fantasyland would be easier to be in than that dust free-nothinng-in-the-room-room?
denniss
 

Dancinbaer

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Messages
1,268
Location
De Pere, WI
Has anyone else thought of using a mini vacuum? The kind they sell for cleaning PC's. I've had this idea for a long time now, I think I'll order one. I'm looking at an office supply catalog as I type this, a vacuum that plugs in is only $26.50 and a battery powered one is only $10.67. I don't have much of a problem with dust even though I frame in the basement. Our house is air conditioned. My brush seems to do a pretty good job. I'll let you know how it works.
 
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Maryann

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 28, 1999
Messages
1,674
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Shippensburg, PA 17257 USA
At the Philly show, one vendor said that you should always seam your glass before assembly. The tiny specks in a frame are often glass splinters. Assembling with unseamed glass scratches the rabbit and creates more splinters, dust, etc. Makes sense to me, it was just something I never thought of. Think I'll give it a try.
 

Ron Eggers

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
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Messages
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Maryann, was that one vendor Greg Fremsted from FrameTek?

Greg's very big on glass seeming, for the reason you mentioned, and because it makes it much easier to install FrameSpace spacers or Glasguard.
 
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Greg Fremstad

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
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Greg also wrote an article for PFM a few years ago titled "Stopping the dust pump" and you can read it for free on the Frame Tek web site. That article has made me a hero to many framers across the country. Check it out -FREE.

Greg Fremstad
Frame Tek, Inc.
 

Jim Miller

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Seaming glass edges reduces the chance of cracks and breaks on slight impact, too.

Dust-free room? Yep, that's absolutely a fantasy. When you take framing materials into such a room, you've taken in the sources of the dust.

I suggest you clean the parts and fit, up to the point of installing the dustcover. Then turn it over and inspect carefully. At that time it's easy to bend up a few points and remove specks of debris. Then push the points back down and look again. When clean, go ahead with the dustcover.

When fitting, remember the "bellows effect" . A fireplace bellows sucks air in when the handles are separated, and blows it out when they come together. Frame parts are like that -- When you put flat items together, they blow air (and debris) out. When you lift them apart, they suck air (and debris) in.

Welcome to The Grumble, Gunz.

"I had a static nightmare shadow box a couple days ago and the mylar would have solved the problem, I think."

Whatever the shadowbox problem, Mylar-D is the solution! :D
 
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