Dust Cover Removal - Conservators?

North Framer

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Ontario, Canada
I have a Group of Seven original in my shop which was framed in 1955. The customer would like to have me remove the kraft paper dust cover (believed to be glued down) without any rips if possible (on the previous one I encountered some small tears after patiently removing with a razor blade between the frame and the cover using a very small 'fileting' cut). Reason to keep is the information and artist signature on the back ( to be kept in an envelope on the back of the new Lineco dust cover). Any suggestions? Steam? thanks in advance. P.S. Framing job is only 2% of art purchase price, I don't have a geologist's degree.
 

JFeig

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A dust over from 1955 would be very brittle. As being made from kraft paper, it's quality is akin to newspaper, high acid and minimally processed.

Might I suggest removing the portion with the signature and title, etc., with amply margin, encapsulated and then attached to the back of the new frame cover.
 

Ron Eggers

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Artists who sign the dust cover usually seem to prefer the part of the paper that's glued/ATGed to the frame.

I think that's a similar phenomenon to people signing mats (at weddings, going-away parties, etc) on the outside 1/4" margin.

That's not a solution - just an editorial comment.
 

HannaFate

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That's one of the reasons I keep a little digital camera around the shop. Take a good picture, THEN try to remove the paper. That way, if you tear something important, you can still print out a reproduction to attach to the new frame.

It's the same idea as taking the wire off and plopping it onto a color copier, only without the trip to Kinko's.
 

Rebecca

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If it's the 1950's it's probably animal glue, which softens with water. Test on unimportants part first. A blunt scalpel helps to get under the paper to the softened glue.

On the other hand, if the signature is that of one of the group of 7, that would be reasonably valuable, and probably a job better suited to a paper conservator. Do you really need the stress/responsibility?

Rebecca
 

Ron Eggers

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I am curious. How many Grumblers, outside of the Canadians, know about the Group of Seven?

For once, I'm not poking fun at the Canadians. Rather, I am struck by my own ignorance.

I had to look it up.
 

Rick Granick

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I thought it was some group of Chinese dissidents who were swept into the ash heap of history during the Great Leap Forward.

:cool: Rick
 

stud d

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next too you
not to hip on history, specialy that of cananda. so what is this seven thing? is it a specific group of artist that formed together for a movement? every other group seems to be like this so I figured i would guess?

What is it?

d
 

Ron Eggers

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Thank you, Rick and Dennis. I feel . . . less ignorant now. :D

Here is one of many websites with information about the Group of Seven.
 
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