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Opinions Wanted Dry mounting large cheap posters (36"x48") - is it possible to get 100% adhesion?

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James Keuning

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Oct 1, 2017
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St Paul, MN
I've got some posters that I have hanging in some large frames. The posters sit between foam core and plexiglass. I have in internal frame that runs the perimeter of the inside back of the frame which applies good contact around the edges, but there is just no way to smash that paper super-flat between the foam core and the plexi. As expected, the posters are starting to sag ever so slightly, but enough to show horizontal ripples when caught in the right light.

Is either a large dry mount vacuum press or a clamshell style heat press capable of getting 100% adhesion? With no bubbles at all?

The problem is that these are thin glossy posters, so any areas of non-contact really stand out. I do not want to throw good money after bad.
 

Shayla

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Hi, James. If value preservation isn't an issue, it sounds like MountCor could help. It has tiny holes all through, which helps to prevent bubbling. Comes in regular and canvas, the latter of which has more aggressive hold. No guarantee that the ripples won't turn to creases in mounting, but if they're fairly subtle, and run parallel to one another, it might flatten right out.
 

Joe B

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As Shayla says, MountCor should work. It adheres at the low temperature of 130 degrees with a dwell of only 3 minutes, IMHO it is the best product on the market because of it adhering at such a low temperature. I would use the canvas because it has a stronger adhesive coating.

The other option is to install several hinges across the top of the poster attaching it to the backing. That will keep it from sagging especially since it sounds like you are doing a DCO (direct contact overlay) with the acrylic.

Lot of luck
 

neilframer

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The "large, cheap posters" is a key.
We get dozens of movie posters a few times a month for upcoming movies that are opening in theaters brought in by the ad company.
We just dry mount and trim them and they put them in their displays at the theaters.

These are all 27" x 40" and we have a two 40" x 60" heat/vacuum presses.
There should be no difference or problems mounting except that you need 40" x 60" mounting boards.
The only thing we have to watch out for is that these movie posters have the reverse (backwards) image on the other side.o_O
Gotta' make sure that we're mounting the front image and not the back.;)

I like Mount Cor, but for these we just use regular Kool Tack and mount at about 180° and we have no problems with the mounting.
 
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Joe B

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I like Mount Cor, but for these we just use regular Kool Tack and mount at about 180° and we have no problems with the mounting.

Neil, you are missing two things here, these are "thin" "glossy" posters. Cheap also has something to do with it because it may be poor printing besides. With a thin glossy poster I would never mount at 180 degrees and I wouldn't use Kool Tack because I have seen some bleed through with thin paper using Kool Tack. The reason I would recommend Mount Cor is for exactly that reason, the temperature is only 130 degrees, not even enough to give you a blister, and the dwell time is only 3 minutes. No matter how you look at it, it is better to be safe than sorry. I agree that if the poster was heavier paper and not glossy, Kool Tack would be the way to go.
 
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neilframer

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All of the movie posters we mount, and we have done thousands of them, are very cheap and very thin and very glossy.
These ad companies use the cheapest, thinnest paper that they can use.
When the movie has had it's run, the posters get tossed.
No problems.
We haven't had to replace any of them, ever, and no bubbles or issues from our mounting.

We have had to contact the ad company a few times for replacements when the posters come in crushed and damaged before we even mount them.
 
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Joe B

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We haven't had to replace any of them, ever, and no bubbles or issues from our mounting.

Cool - now I know that I can use Kool Tack at 180 degrees to mount posters. See, you did all the hard work for me again :D:D:D
 

neilframer

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Cool - now I know that I can use Kool Tack at 180 degrees to mount posters. See, you did all the hard work for me again :D:D:D
Wait a minute!
Every situation is different.

We have just expanded our company to take over two other companies.
We have taken over the space of a large space behind our shop and we've absorbed a graphics mounting company and another frameshop where the owners retired.
The graphics mounting company mounts on Plexi and on dibond with roller presses and they also are framers.

The other frameshop, where the owners retired has given us their clients and we are slammed along with our design company clients.
We are doing a ton of high end framing for a design company run by a woman I used to work with.
She has followed me thru a few companies and it's a little crazy.
I am the detail checker, problem solver, etc. etc.

I am supposed to take a vacation and my boss keeps telling me to pencil it in on the calendar, but the work keeps pouring in and I am the manager of all of this.:confused:

Sorry, I really need a vacation....:cool:
I don't like to leave when there are things that still need to be handled.
 

Philliam Phulgor

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Wait a minute!
Every situation is different.

I am the detail checker, problem solver, etc. etc.

I am supposed to take a vacation and my boss keeps telling me to pencil it in on the calendar, but the work keeps pouring in and I am the manager of all of this.:confused:

Sorry, I really need a vacation....:cool:
I don't like to leave when there are things that still need to be handled.
Neil, Neil, Neil, Neil, Neil...............you should be getting drowsy and be in holiday mindset now...................

You are now here for for some well earned renewal time:

bed-floats-in-still-water-stock-photograph_csp6351009.jpg
...........................you can frame it for me later
 

neilframer

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Neil, Neil, Neil, Neil, Neil...............you should be getting drowsy and be in holiday mindset now...................

You are now here for for some well earned renewal time:

bed-floats-in-still-water-stock-photograph_csp6351009.jpg
...........................you can frame it for me later
I hear and obey, I hear and obey, I hear and obey, I hear and obey...........
Oops, just heard that I'm needed on a giant installation job this Friday....
And so it goes....o_O

But, I seem to be getting drowsy, drowsy, drowsy, drowsy.....

 
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Shayla

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I like Mount Cor, but for these we just use regular Kool Tack and mount at about 180° and we have no problems with the mounting.

Why 180, rather than the recommended 150? Does it work better for these at that temp?
 

MarkF

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Oct 21, 2001
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74
Location
Minneapolis
I've got some posters that I have hanging in some large frames. The posters sit between foam core and plexiglass. I have in internal frame that runs the perimeter of the inside back of the frame which applies good contact around the edges, but there is just no way to smash that paper super-flat between the foam core and the plexi. As expected, the posters are starting to sag ever so slightly, but enough to show horizontal ripples when caught in the right light.

Is either a large dry mount vacuum press or a clamshell style heat press capable of getting 100% adhesion? With no bubbles at all?

The problem is that these are thin glossy posters, so any areas of non-contact really stand out. I do not want to throw good money after bad.


James

Your question is whether a mechanical or vacuum press can get 100% adhesion with no bubbles. Yes, either absolutely can. Any of the low-temperature covered boards, like Mount Cor or Kool Tack will do the job, as will any tissue with a breathable paper core. If you are not getting complete adhesion, the cause is trapped moisture. In most cases where this happens the outside edge has adhered, and some or all of the center of the mount appears flat but the adhesive has not been activated because a thin layer of air has prevented contact between the art and adhesive.

Try preheating the posters (and foamboard if using separate tissue) before mounting, to drive off the moisture. For fragile items mounting at lower temperatures can be helpful, but for general mounting such as posters I recommend you use 175 as a starting point both for drying and for mounting.

Mark
Superior Moulding
Minneapolis
 

Shayla

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For fragile items mounting at lower temperatures can be helpful, but for general mounting such as posters I recommend you use 175 as a starting point both for drying and for mounting.

Hi, Mark. Am guessing that this suggestion does not include the sort of prints for which lower temp boards were designed? (i.e. digital prints that keep their color if mounted at 130 degrees). It sure can be tricky to know what to use, when someone brings in a random print.
 

Joe B

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but for general mounting such as posters I recommend you use 175 as a starting point both for drying and for mounting.

You guys are tops with the drymounting, that's why I bring all of my oversized mounting to you.

I do have a problem with 175 degrees plus for glossy prints though. I have done several and it seems the higher temperature makes it a appear not as glossy, more of a matt finish look. I'm sure it all depends upon the type of printing and ink involved but when I use Mount Cor at 130 degrees I don't really have a problem with any of the glossy pieces.
 
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JWB9999999

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
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Feb 22, 2009
Messages
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Location
Meridian, MS
I see people saying KootTack and 180 degrees in the same sentence. If you are using their Permalon board when mounting with KoolTack, as recommended, you should never exceed 165 degrees or you risk destroying the Permalon sheet. We typically use 155 degrees. Since those sheets cost a fortune, and are hard if not impossible to replace at times, you don't want to mess them up. (Likewise, you don't want to leave the Permalon sheet in the heat press for more than a minute or so at a time, or you risk destroying it.)

If you aren't using the Permalon sheet, then I don't suppose 180 would be a problem.
 

Greg Fremstad

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Sep 4, 2002
Messages
956
Location
Eugene OR
Framing glossy art up against either glass or acrylic will likely result in "wet spots". Better to add a spacer to keep the poster, mounted or not, from touching the glazing.
 
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