• Welcome! You will have to REGISTER a free account, before you can access the system. If you already registered, please LOG IN. (top right)
    If you can't remember your password, CLICK HERE to reset it. If you have questions, feel free to click the CONTACT US link at the bottom of this page.

Opinions Wanted cutting angus with morso

Ad Banner for SmallCorp

imaluma

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Thread starter
Joined
Jun 17, 2005
Messages
1,691
Location
I left my heart in san francisco/ st louis
I want to cut a multiple sided frame at home in my own time which means using my Morso. I want to use an angus frame from LJ for this design, has anybody cut this on a morso and experienced any trouble? I may just redesign, I'm worried it might snag on the back side on that last cut. Thanks!
 
Upvote 1

Prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,369
Location
The Grand Duchy of Lincolnyshire
It's possible to do multi-angle frames on a Morso, but not easy. For a start you have to cut the rails at 45° first (or saw them square) slightly over size and then reset the fences
to whatever angle - say 22.5° for octagonal. Here's the tricky bit. On an 8-sided frame you have 16 faces all of which must be spot-on angles. A slight deviation on one fence will be
multiplied 8x in assembly. The only way do get the set up right is to spend time cutting scrap pieces and dry-fit testing until there are no gaps in the joins. This could take hours.
Fine if you are doing a large run, but not for just a few frames. There is also the issue of getting the rails all the right length - no measuring stops.
Much simpler on a saw, as long as you have a saw where you can reset the blade angle.

Never cut this particular moulding btw. :rolleyes:
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,220
Location
Phoenix, AZ
The Angus line is a "Faux leather wrapped" moulding, almost like thick contact paper, and you can't really touch it up at all.
Multi sided frames usually need a little touch-up work at the corners.

The House of Mercier makes real leather wrapped frames, which are closed corner frames..
http://www.mertrade.net/frames/index.php?token=

By the way, I just looked at Larson's web site, haven't been there for a bit, and what a mess.:mad:
Kind of like what Roma has done. I don't need to be "wowed" and I don't need the song and dance.
I just want a catalogue so I can check out a moulding and order it before it's discontinued...o_O

Sometimes these people just need to leave things alone and quit "niggling".
"If it ain't broke, (please) don't fix it.:cool:
 
Last edited:

Joe B

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
5,302
Location
Blaine, Minnesota
I have sold a bit of Angus and I chop it most the time - a few times I had to use the saw but I mainly use the Morso chopper. I keep sharp knives on my chopper and have not had a single problem. I have not done a multi angled frame so can't speak for that but for the rectangle it is just fine.
 

Prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,369
Location
The Grand Duchy of Lincolnyshire
The last time I did a multi-angle was back in the days of wallpaper clad mirrors. I used some quite chunky stuff.

It was a massive pain and by the time I got a frame with no gaps I had done so much trimming of the miters that
the frame was about 2" smaller than it was originally envisaged. Fortunately I got the octagonal bevelled mirrors
after I made the frame. Nice to do as an exercise, but never done another.
 
Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

imaluma

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Thread starter
Joined
Jun 17, 2005
Messages
1,691
Location
I left my heart in san francisco/ st louis
It's possible to do multi-angle frames on a Morso, but not easy. For a start you have to cut the rails at 45° first (or saw them square) slightly over size and then reset the fences
to whatever angle - say 22.5° for octagonal. Here's the tricky bit. On an 8-sided frame you have 16 faces all of which must be spot-on angles. A slight deviation on one fence will be
multiplied 8x in assembly. The only way do get the set up right is to spend time cutting scrap pieces and dry-fit testing until there are no gaps in the joins. This could take hours.
Fine if you are doing a large run, but not for just a few frames. There is also the issue of getting the rails all the right length - no measuring stops.
Much simpler on a saw, as long as you have a saw where you can reset the blade angle.

Never cut this particular moulding btw. :rolleyes:

Thanks for the tips. I plan to do some practice runs with scrap material to see if I can pull it off.
 

imaluma

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Thread starter
Joined
Jun 17, 2005
Messages
1,691
Location
I left my heart in san francisco/ st louis
UPDATE: My practice frame worked beautifully. Apparently I am very good at eyeballing angles. Who knew? The only problem is that the supports for the rabbet didn't line up with the moulding so in order to cut my practice frame without the rabbet blowing out I just flipped it upside down. How would one source "scrap" material of a very specific height to use underneath the rabbet while cutting?
 

David Waldmann

Herder of cats
Forum Donor
Featured Vendor
Joined
Feb 6, 2002
Messages
7,942
Location
Chester, Vermont USA
Business
Vermont Hardwoods
How would one source "scrap" material of a very specific height to use underneath the rabbet while cutting?

The best way to do this is get a table saw. IMO every framer should have a table saw. Doesn't need to be a $20k Altendorf, just a cheap bench top model (probably can get one on craigslist for under $100) will do 99% of what you might need want to do.
 

Bob Doyle

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Messages
19,506
Location
South Berwick, Maine
Table saw, zero clearance insert, finger boards and push sticks :) I have the table saw and have yet to add the safety equipment. The Morso can do a number on you imagine the speed a table saw could do worse.

Don't get me wrong, definitely get a table saw, just be smarter than me, be safe with it. :)

Until you get a table saw you should be able to pick up a sticks in 1 by 1 configurations or even have a piece of small thin moulding, ie 1/2" flats that could fit in under the lip. You just need small pieces near the chopper blades. We all have scraps too small to use for anything, they can be used to fill in for supports, or even to build up the supports for when cutting shadow box moulding.

When I saw cutting angus I wondered if cutting Kobe beef would be next.
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Resource Provider
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
8,825
Location
Wilkes-Barre, PA
IMO every framer should have a table saw.

And a no-melt plastic blade (Tenyru, not the home improvement store laminate blades) so you never have to score acrylic on your wall cutter. Mucho faster and better cuts.
 
Rian Fabrication Services  www.rianfabrication.com
LifeSaver Cloud from LifeSaver Software, Inc.
Top