Question CNC Chopping

picture framing clamps by MasterClamp 2021

GottaGetThisRight

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I visited my local maker space recently and while watching the CNC machine operate I wondered if anyone has attempted to use one for cutting frames, with the right jig designed to hold a volume of pieces. Once the setup is worked out, a lot of pieces could be cut while off doing other work. I'm not sure how accurately it would cut compared to a quality fixed miter saw...
 

alacrity8

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It takes me about a minute to cut a frame on a Double Mitre Saw.
On my Mitre Sled, it takes about 2 minutes.

The clamping and set up on a CNC seems likely to take longer.

It might be worth it if you have access to a CNC, and not a saw.
 

Rick Hennen

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CNC machining can be applied to a large number of manufacturing process. We have a CNC router set up for working with wood. The same set up we have can be adapted to plasma cutting, drilling, surfacing and numerous other applications. CNC capabilities can also work with miter saws, table saws, sanding, finishing etc. I ypou care to explore this further, the annual AWFS Woodworking show, whichis usually in July, has dozens of applications on display. I've seen one operation where a sheet of plywood goes in one end of a machining process which incorporates several pieces of CNC operated equipment and a dozen cabinet doors come out the other end, already stained and finished. The most important part of this process is the software. Unlike Computerized mat cutters where you can design and cut with one software, CNC machining usually involves 2 steps. First the project is designed in a CAD program that will create the drawings as vectors and then converts those to G-Code. The G-Code, which comes in many different formats depending on the piece of equipment, is then imported into the software which drives the equipment and actually tells the machine what to do. If you want to get a better feel for this process one of the more popular CAD programs is V-Carve Pro (2.5 D) and Eclipse (3D) by Vectric and one of the more widely used CNC operating software is Mach 3 or 4.
 

CHolt

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Yes, I've done so. I've milled the rabbet and then cut miters with a vee-bit on a CNC to make a shadow box. Especially useful when working with short boards. It is also possible to line the bottom side of full length stock with masking tape, and if it's flat and in plane with the rabbet you can miter with a vee-bit just shy of the tape and then fold up the box, taping the last corner. Thats a good process for jewelry boxes too. That said I don't do it as routine practice. Milling on the shaper and mitering with the saw is more productive IMO.
 

GottaGetThisRight

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Interesting replies. Thank you. It was something that crossed my mind; maybe one day I'll play around with the idea.
 
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