Closing the back..

PeterAM

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What's the best/most efficient/neatest way to close up the back of a Neilsen type metal frame.
I frame a fair number of photo prints (up to 20" X 26") and have yet to come up with an acceptable way to seal the backs of these frames.

Thanks.
 

Steven6095

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Nicholasville, KY
I try to fill with scrap foam core.
Looks best with a peice of matboard so you have a nice finished back.
 

Sherry Lee

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Welcome PeterAM!!

What do you mean by "accepable way to seal the backs"? Are you looking for a way to make it look 'nice' or to seal it from dust, bugs and other foreign objects?
 

Val

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Carson City, Nevada
Yes, PeterAM, welcome to the Grumble! Be prepared, you will get a multitude of answers on this topic. I believe most of them will be "correct", based on personal preferences of each framer. The last thread on this topic nearly caught fire!
I've used good ol' spring clips for many years, spaced evenly and closely enough for even pressure, otherwise buckling may happen, the art backed by foamcore or topped with matboard if you really want to get pretty, as Steven6095 suggested. I use a small matbd scrap under the clip to avoid the metallic "skid marks" they'll leave otherwise, then pull it out when it's under the frame lip.
Some find eye protection necessary when using spring clips (BOING!), some will not use them at all but use enough layers of backing/matbd to squeeze the package into the frame.
Ultimately, you'll have to decide what's best for you. Fasten your seatbelt!

You might look under SEARCH at the top of the page and get pages and pages of "suggestions", if you need your answer right away, considering it's Sunday and sometimes slow here, many are out there doing non-framing stuff.
 

PeterAM

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Sherry:

Looking to seal from dust, etc. I'm framing Epson Ultrachrome inkjet prints and want to keep dust out as much as possible. The surface of these prints (matte)will be most likely be damaged if someone takes them out of the frame to clean the inside of the glazing and/or mat.
 

johnny

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Run some acid free tape on the side of the glass and matting/foamboard package, taping the glass down and sealing the edges. Then just finish off the back with spring or foam as you normally would.
 

Sherry Lee

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Peter,

I did a quick search - part of this thread is applicable:

http://www.thegrumble.com/cgibin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=006911

Take a look at "preservator's" comment especially.

Sealing the frame package itself will help.

I recently had a job to reframe a metal framed piece that was full of spiders. If I'm doing a conservation job, I refuse to use metal. Personally, I have never sealed a frame package being placed into a metal frame because I feel if the customer is worried about protection, a wood frame is a must.

I might be off base there - just my personal philosophy. But I see no reason why the 'package' can't be sealed before being placed into a metal frame. I'll be curious what other's say they do.

Again, read what I found on my quick search and continue the search - many have written about taping the frame package.
 

RoboFramer

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Originally posted by Val:
The last thread on this topic nearly caught fire!
Val,

You went and made me dig it up, just read the whole 3 pages.

Welcome PeterAM - here is an example of what can happen on TG All THIS Kicked off one day just because a Grumbler wanted to get his name on every topic in the forum.

Some of it is relevant, most of it discusses filling the back out in preference to using spring clips. all of it is good reading!
 

FramerDave

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If I'm doing a conservation job, I refuse to use metal. Personally, I have never sealed a frame package being placed into a metal frame because I feel if the customer is worried about protection, a wood frame is a must.
I'll respectfully disagree and present another view.

Metal frames can indeed do very nicely for conservation framing. And it's simple. First, dispense with spring clips and fill in the back of the frame with extra board. Foamcore, matboard, whatever it takes to fill up the channel so that everything just fits, but not too tightly. This will deprive the spiders of a hiding place and it eliminates the big spaces where dust can collect.

Then seal up the back with frame sealing tape. Run it along the inner edge of the frame onto the backing. A lot of the newer metals have a nice wide "foot" where the tape can be attached. Older or narrower ones don't, but you can run the tape up off the backing onto the inside edge of the frame. Just clean off the metal first with alcohol to eliminate oils or other contaminants that could interfere with the tape.

Now the frame package is completely sealed off from dust and insects.

metalframe4bg.jpg


A good argument could be made that metal frames are better for conservation framing since, being metal, they contain no lignin or other harmful substances that could harm artwork.

This diploma here is in a metal frame stacked inside of a wood. It looks good and the metal acts as a good physical barrier against any migration of acidic byproducts of the lignin or offgassing.

diplom7ws.jpg


So if a metal frame looks good for the design use it. The sole fact that it's metal and not wood should not lead us to dismiss them completely.
 

RoboFramer

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Originally posted by FramerDave:

everything just fits, but not too tightly. This will deprive the spiders of a hiding place and it eliminates the big spaces where dust can collect.

We may not be talking 'full conservation' here but a wood frame given this same treatment, would be better - dust would still eventually get in though.

It's sealed from the back but not from the front, and there is play - things with teeth that lay eggs can get in, so can dust.

But if you seal the glass/mat/backmount package and slide that in, then the frame backing, then fill the space if you don't want to use spring clips, and even then still do what you have done -that would be better.

I don't seal the glass into every job - some do - but I do seal the glass into every metal frame job.
 

Sherry Lee

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That looks very nice FramerDave! And your points are well taken.

This is what I imagine happening 'over time'; the frame sealing tape loosening from the metal frame - even faster than a dust cover from a wood frame. Who's to know. BUT, as John again added, if one seals the frame package, it wouldn't matter which type of frame you use. And that's a "Good Thing"!

I've been sealing almost all of my frame packages these days! Selfishly, the main reason is that when I do, and then insert the framers nails and flip it over for a last 'check', there are no 'foreign objects' to be found! I have yet to reopen a project that I've sealed. It makes my day!

So, living in Phoenix, aka "spider land", sealing the frame package is a must! That's the second reason I go to that effort.

Great discussion!
 

PeterAM

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Thanks for all your input(s). Sealing the glass/mat/backmount package and sealing the back looks like the way to go for me.
 

Framar

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Buffalo, New York, USA/Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada
Here's another note about Lineco Frame Sealing Tape - when exposed to light (natural or artificial) for too much time - it turns pale green!!!

I used some to block off ad lettering on a bent plastic easel once for the window - grey when it went into the window - green when it came out a few weeks later!!!
 
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