Chinese Painting on Silk

Framerguy

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Apr 12, 2001
Posts
7,261
From
Destin, Florida
I got this in from a customer yesterday. She wants the wrinkles taken out and mounted without mats and framed.

This painting, according to her, has been passed down through her Oriental family for a few generations and it is quite delicate. It appears to have been painted on ultra-thin <strike>paper</strike>silk and measures approx. 19 1/2" high x 31 1/2" long. <strike>It is every bit as thin as the white tissue wrapping paper that is used for gifts.</strike>


chinesepainting1.jpg


It is not backed at all and I am wondering if I should even attempt to flatten it, mount it on a suitable backing, and then hinge mount it.

Here is a closeup of the wrinkles:

chinesepaintingcloseup.jpg


I would really like some advice on this piece as it is irreplaceable and I don't intend to overextend my capabilities on the painting. If you need further information about the painting ask here or email me.

Thanks for the help.

Framerguy

Edit:

I looked at this painting under a 30X magnifier and it is NOT thin paper as I said. It is very thin (think single strand thickness) silk! That changes the entire rules of the game for me. Now I need some serious help! After visiting the website that somebody (Rebecca?) posted on relining silk paintings, I don't know if I can handle this project.

Advice is really needed now!

[ 05-20-2004, 12:43 PM: Message edited by: Framerguy ]
 

preservator

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Mar 23, 2001
Posts
2,209
From
Wilmington, DE
You are wise to be careful, here. This should be
handled by someone who is skilled in mounting
Oriental paintings and the advice that Rebecca
and Alan gave on that thread should be followed.

Hugh
 

katman

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jan 5, 2002
Posts
559
From
annapolis, md., usa
I had a piece like this that was a bit smaller (approx 16 x22)and had some damage I suspect was caused by a combination of poor storage and insects. This may not work for your customer, but I convinced my customer to let us scan the original, "fix" the damage in the computer, and print copies for framing. Pretty sure we did one on synthetic "silk" as well as on canvas and watercolor paper. She was delighted. Put the original in a sleeve and special storage box so it can be passed on to the children.
 

preservator

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Mar 23, 2001
Posts
2,209
From
Wilmington, DE
Katman's solution is a good one, since silk looses
half of its strength after 220 hours of exposure
to sunlight.

Hugh
 
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