Best miter solution?

2400

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I have a small shop and I want to start chopping my own frames. In your respected opinion what is the best overall solution for a small space that can be utilized quickly, portable, and can be put away just as fast. I would like to hear about any combinations, solutions, and ideas with brand recommendations. Thank you for your time!
 

Ron Eggers

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Hmmmm . . . Compact and portable?

Choppers do a nice job on most wood, but they weigh a ton. They do have the advantage, in the small shop especially, of being quiet and dust-free, When I have to move mine more than a foot-or-two, I call Two Men and a Truck and they send three men.

I suppose the most compact saw setup would be a ten- or twelve-inch miter saw with a commercial or home-made measuring bench, but it's not something I'd want to lug around too much, either. The saw is portable but, but when you add the bench . . .

Oh, wait. I DID cut frames for a while (before I had a shop) with a good quality carpenter's miter box and backsaw. It was very compact, very portable, very quiet - but the corners weren't very good and, if I had been using some of the bigger mouldings, I'd still be sawing my first frame thirty years later.

I'm not making fun of you, but I don't know that such a thing exists.
 

Puppyraiser

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This may come under the "pick any two" rule. "Cheap, good, portable; pick two" If you are ready to make the switch to chopping your own, it is probably time to 'bite the bullet' and get the best equipment you can possibly stretch to afford. I know some folks that do their chopping off-site (like in their garage or basement at home) That might be an alternate solution...
 

BUDDY

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I have a saw made no longer but was mad by the peole who made the Circle master in Mississippi( Bill Hurstel I think) It has hinged guide arms that allow you to raise them when needed and prop them up at the end . I think some of the other saw comapnys have or will modify their equipment to acheive the same space saving benifits.
Check around and even ask if they don't show it.
BUDDY
 

Framerguy

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Originally posted by 2400:
I have a small shop and I want to start chopping my own frames. In your respected opinion what is the best overall solution for a small space that can be utilized quickly, portable, and can be put away just as fast.
And you would store this piece of equipment where?? If you find some kind of truly "portable" chopping equipment you still have to have an equivalent space to store it when not in use. Why not simply let it sit where it is and utilize the space below it for storage of other things?

Also keep in mind that, wherever you locate your chopping equipment, you will need at least 15' of open space at the infeed end of the equipment for length moulding. It seems like a mitersaw setup like Ron alluded to would be your overall best bet for starters. After you grow your business and have a need for more work space, you could opt for a larger more dedicated saw like a Pistorious or similar type.

Framerguy
 

Jim Miller

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Sounds like you might enjoy the Fletcher 7000 Miter Measuring System, which works on most common electric miter saws. It has side-wings with a very accurate measuring system.

The Phaedra SawHelper is another possibility. It is a free-standing set of legs & side-wings, which are easily folded for transpotrt or storage. This setup is often used by construction carpenters on job sites. Again, it works with most common electric miter saws.
 

2400

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Thank you for all the responses. Without the Grumble, I am nothing...I like the idea of having the tools at the house, not the most comfortable thing but with a small shop it should work until I make a million bucks and get a bigger one. I will also look into the Fletcher and the Sawhelper. Many thanks again...
 

KwajPrints

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I use the Fletcher 7100 which is the version of the 7000 that incorporates the digital measuring system. It is rather expensive but I absolutely love it and am convinced that it's a great tool for an operation of my small size. It gives me the flexibility to cut wood or metal. The digital system eliminates any possibility of error on the measuring as I don't have to think about allowences, it measures the rabbit directly, and is easily adjusted to accomodate thin profiles whch would otherwise cause problems with the pointer system.The mounting system is designed to mate up to most any 10" say - I use the Makita with 100 tooth Forrest combo blades.

I wouldn't exactly refer to it as portable although I can lift and move it (saw and all) fairly easily. I try not to move it too much as the support leg on the right table has to be readjusted after movement.

Steve
 
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