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Best backing for framing?

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Wildenfeldt

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Jan 3, 2021
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Martins Inramningar & Prints
Hi!
Sometimes when I frame larger pieces the backing board (5mm thick Klugg backing board) tends to buckle. I do not live in the best climate, sometimes dry, sometimes damp, hot and cold.
Is there a board that is the best backing board for framing?
I have not tried foamboard but maybe that is good choice?
And do you use a humidifier in your shop to keep the humidity at around 40-60 % that is the recommended percentage?
 

wpfay

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For avoiding humidity issues and mount boards, you might try polyflute, brand name Coroplast, though it make be marketed under other names where you are. It is a fluted panel of pure polypropylene and is ahygroscopic, and dimensionally stable in normal environments. Panels can be fixed together for larger projects, running the flutes perpendicular to one another. There is a wealth of information on this product in the archives.
Another stable choice is Aluminum Composite Panels ACM). Also thoroughly discussed in the archives.
Both items are available through plastics distributors and sign shops.
 

Echobelly

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We use Coroplast for work we do for an art conservator and any especially valuable pieces. In most cases, foam core is used, however. We use acid free, but I've been told the facings are acid free but the foam core isn't, and have seen older samples where the core has yellowed.
 

Wildenfeldt

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How do you seal the frame on the back the frame when using coroplast? I do not use any self adhesive tapes, only gummed tape. And that does not attach to plastic.
Do you know a place in EU that sells the coroplast?
 

Keith L Hewitt

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Coroplast is I believe made in USA. An almost similar product Correx is widely available in Europe
LION UK stock it www.lionpic.co.uk
I would imagine its stocked by the likes of Konstlist,
But ask here first sweden@corexgroup.com
Do let us know how you get on.
Are you aware of the No1 backing boards made by Oppboga and sold by Konstlist?
 
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Wildenfeldt

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Thank you for your answer. Which backing board is No 1? I can not find any of value on konstlist site.
 

Keith L Hewitt

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Prospero

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The convention on this side of the pond is to tape around the frame and onto a backing board.
I assume you are used to doing it this way. This makes the use of plastic backers problematic as the
tape won't stick well, particularly if you use wet gummed tape (as I do). Pressure sensitive tapes will stick
better but tend to hard a limited life. They either go extremely goooey or dry up.
US framers use a covering of paper over the entire back which is stuck to the frame. A good method, but
this is more or less unknown over here. All a matter of what you are accustomed to. ;)
 

Wildenfeldt

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Then we have a problem I assume. So I have to make a sandwich with glazing, passepartout, the art, then some kind of paper backing, then the correx and lastly another backing board made of paper so that I can seal the frame with wet gummed tape. It feels overkill.
 
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Ylva

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The way it is done in the US is that you use the correx as the backing/mounting board. You fit the package into the frame, with framer's points and then you paper over the whole back with dustcover paper.
Which is attached either with ATG or glue, depending on preference. I still use ATG, which is a little more expensive.
 

Prospero

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Then we have a problem I assume. So I have to make a sandwich with glazing, passepartout, the art, then some kind of paper backing, then the correx and lastly another backing board made of paper so that I can seal the frame with wet gummed tape. It feels overkill.

I think you may be under a misapprehension......

Traditionally, paper-bourne art is mounted using a 'bookmount'. This is a piece of board hinged to a window mat
along one side. The art is hinged to the undermount. This allows the art/mat to be removed from the frame and handled
safely, but also examined fully by flipping back the windowed part. It's a method used in galleries/collections where
most of the art is not framed but stored away in archival boxes in drawers. In this state it can be put into a frame at any
time and hung for display. But any students/academics can study the art (in its entirety) without touching it.
Glass/Bookmount/Solid back. Hinging to the window mat is not the way to do it. Think of the mounting as a separate unit
sandwiched between the glazing and a protective back.
 

David Hewitt

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A delayed welcome Wildenfeidt, what a beautiful country you live in. Would love to hear about Sweden.
Your question is simple for a standard frame package. Try to use quality products for longevity and protection as needed.

Standard Package =
Glazing
Mat Board ( or spacing for glazing)
Artwork
Backing ( Rag board, Foam board, Correx)
Sealing ( self adhesive tapes, preferably free of acids, Framers Tape, or Artist Tapes)
Add a Frame
Thats it.:)
 

Wildenfeldt

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A delayed welcome Wildenfeidt, what a beautiful country you live in. Would love to hear about Sweden.
Your question is simple for a standard frame package. Try to use quality products for longevity and protection as needed.

Standard Package =
Glazing
Mat Board ( or spacing for glazing)
Artwork
Backing ( Rag board, Foam board, Correx)
Sealing ( self adhesive tapes, preferably free of acids, Framers Tape, or Artist Tapes)
Add a Frame
Thats it.:)
Thank you David. Sweden is a beautiful country and I enjoy living here even though it is quite cold. It has just started to snow here. The situation with covid is okay. All shops are open and we have not had a lockdown, yet. So business is good.

Well I use some of the best materials in the business. At the most minimum UV70-glazing, often cotton rag matt board, thick 5mm backing, sealing with acid free gummed tape, always distilled water for all gummed tape and so on.
But I am going to try the correx and see how it works. But I am not a big fan of self adhesive tape. It loosens over time. (I know because I have been framing 15 years now and in the beginning I used self adhesive tape to seal the package). :)
 

Wildenfeldt

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Jan 3, 2021
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Martins Inramningar & Prints
I think you may be under a misapprehension......

Traditionally, paper-bourne art is mounted using a 'bookmount'. This is a piece of board hinged to a window mat
along one side. The art is hinged to the undermount. This allows the art/mat to be removed from the frame and handled
safely, but also examined fully by flipping back the windowed part. It's a method used in galleries/collections where
most of the art is not framed but stored away in archival boxes in drawers. In this state it can be put into a frame at any
time and hung for display. But any students/academics can study the art (in its entirety) without touching it.
Glass/Bookmount/Solid back. Hinging to the window mat is not the way to do it. Think of the mounting as a separate unit
sandwiched between the glazing and a protective back.
That is the way I frame. The best way I think it is. But thank you for the information.
 
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David Hewitt

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But I am not a big fan of self adhesive tape. It loosens over time. (I know because I have been framing 15 years now and in the beginning I used self adhesive tape to seal the package). :)
True self adhesives can, and will, most likely fail at some point in time, but proper burnishing will greatly improve their hold and longevity. I have items of my own done for testing ( Filmplast P90 for example ) over 35 years ago and still holding. (I inspect the package every 7-10 years):)

Just for conversation, some of the self adhesive VHB tapes ( very high bond ) are used on some very high stressed items, such as motor homes, cars and semi truck trailers, with a long life expectancy.
 

Wildenfeldt

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But to use Filmoplast for sealing the package seems excessive. I have to come up with a good solution. 😁
 

wpfay

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Unfortunately the use of water activated gum adhesive requires a certain porosity to stick successfully, and that porosity is what you are trying to avoid to help control or mitigate the effects of humidity.
There are ways around this but it always involves additional labor and materials, or the use of materials you are not comfortable using.

Clear packing tape that has an acrylic based adhesive is relatively inexpensive, easy to apply, and, when burnished after application, will stay in place a very long time. From what I've read, the bond actually strengthens over time, and unless acted upon by relatively extreme environmental events, won't oxidize as some other packing tapes will.

Jim Miller has experimented extensively with using polyflute panels, and is a proponent of this clear packing tape for fashioning the dust jacket on both polyflute and on the poly based frames where sealing the back is also an issue.
 

Wildenfeldt

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Martins Inramningar & Prints
Unfortunately the use of water activated gum adhesive requires a certain porosity to stick successfully, and that porosity is what you are trying to avoid to help control or mitigate the effects of humidity.
There are ways around this but it always involves additional labor and materials, or the use of materials you are not comfortable using.

Clear packing tape that has an acrylic based adhesive is relatively inexpensive, easy to apply, and, when burnished after application, will stay in place a very long time. From what I've read, the bond actually strengthens over time, and unless acted upon by relatively extreme environmental events, won't oxidize as some other packing tapes will.

Jim Miller has experimented extensively with using polyflute panels, and is a proponent of this clear packing tape for fashioning the dust jacket on both polyflute and on the poly based frames where sealing the back is also an issue.
What is that tape called? Does it have a brand name? I would like to look it up and try it.
 
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wpfay

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Here's a link to a brand that qualifies. The key is to make sure it is an acrylic based adhesive rather than a rubber based one.
 

Jim Miller

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The 2" clear packing tape I use is 3M Heavy Duty Packing tape. Most brands would be OK, but I've used a few that have very flimsy tape ribbon and gummy adhesive - beware of the cheap tapes. Personally, I would not trust Filmoplast for this application, as I think it might fail faster in open air.

The American method of gluing a paper dustcover to the back of your frame might be worth a try. It's easy, inexpensive, not unattractive, and it would enable you to use a fluted polypropylene backer without issues.
 

Wildenfeldt

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The 2" clear packing tape I use is 3M Heavy Duty Packing tape. Most brands would be OK, but I've used a few that have very flimsy tape ribbon and gummy adhesive - beware of the cheap tapes. Personally, I would not trust Filmoplast for this application, as I think it might fail faster in open air.

The American method of gluing a paper dustcover to the back of your frame might be worth a try. It's easy, inexpensive, not unattractive, and it would enable you to use a fluted polypropylene backer without issues.
Yes it might be a good choice to try it out. What type of dustcover paper do you use? Is there not a risk of it being punctured when the customer picks the frame up. I can imagine that the customer grips the frame and drives their finger nails into the dustcover. Or is there something that I am missing?
 

Jim Miller

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Yes it might be a good choice to try it out. What type of dustcover paper do you use? Is there not a risk of it being punctured when the customer picks the frame up. I can imagine that the customer grips the frame and drives their finger nails into the dustcover. Or is there something that I am missing?
The finger-poking hazard is real. To avoid that, we fill the frame's depth, so that there is no air gap under the paper. Of course the dustcover paper can still be torn, but it's less likely with a solid surface directly beneath it. The paper I prefer is the blue or grey alpha cellulose backing paper marketed by Lineco and sold by some framing distributors. However, most framers use ordinary Kraft paper.
 
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framah

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..or Tyvek instead of any paper as a backer. I started using it because of the customer poking their fingers thru the paper.
It looks better as well.
 

Wildenfeldt

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..or Tyvek instead of any paper as a backer. I started using it because of the customer poking their fingers thru the paper.
It looks better as well.
I did a search on Tyvek and it has great properties. Do you use ATG for it to hold to the back of the frame? Where do you buy it?
 
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