Be Careful

Rick Granick

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I'm not superstitious, but maybe I shouldn't have changed my chopper blades on Friday the 13th. Ended up spending 7 hours in the ER. I am very respectful of sharp things, and try to maintain strict awareness when using the chopper and especially when changing out the blades. This was just a freak thing, but while using the socket wrench that came with the unit so many years ago to tighten one of the retaining bolts on the left blade, the wrench somehow slipped off the bolt and the top of my hand ended up hitting the blade. Thinking back on how it could have happened, I think it would be wise to stand at an angle facing the blade while doing this, rather than right in front of the chopper as you do when using it. I believe this stance will help assure the socket sits straight on the bolt as it should. I think I will also purchase an extra-deep socket this size so that my hands are farther away from the blade when doing this task.
:cool: Rick

DON'T do this:
 

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Romanf

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Not good! Whenever I work with sharp objects, including glass, i always wear cutresistant gloves….saved my bacon a few times😃
 
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Mike Labbe

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It could have been worse! I hope you heal soon.
 
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cvm

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Ouch, man! Glad you're okay! Grainger has chainmail gloves. Excellent whenever you're working around any type of blades. Also awesome for oyster shucking :cool: .
 

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Wow, take care, Rick.
In my profile I have this line...
"51 year picture framer (and I still have all of my fingers)"
I may have a scar or two but I still have my fingers.
I've worked with some Morsos, a Hansen, a Jyden, FrameSquare saw, Pistorius saw, 2 CTD saws and Dewalts.

Hang on to those digits.:thumbsup:
 
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Larry Peterson

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When I had my Morso I hated changing the blades - wanted to make sure I could still play the piano. (actually played for a living for a couple of years when I was a kiddo). Much rather change the blades on my EMN-12 although you still have to be careful. Easy to scrap/cut knuckles when loosening the blades. And always make sure to unplug it first.
 

Ylva

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Ouch Rick, glad it wasn't worse but what a freaky thing to happen.

I don't use my Morso, prefer my saws. I don't mind changing sawblades. Don't think I ever want to change my chopper blades.

Hope you heal well and fast.
 
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Yikes! This thread made me order some XL cut proof gloves for Hubby. If you're on antibiotics, you might want to add some fermented kraut to your diet. And here's hoping you heal soon.
 

Dirk

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I think I will also purchase an extra-deep socket this size
Hey Rick-
Looks like the blood pump is working.
You might think twice about a deep socket. Whether deep socket or extension, the further the ratchet handle is from the bolt head or nut, the greater the likelihood the wrench will slip off. Can you use the box end of a combination wrench? That keeps the torque in line with the bolt head or nut. If clearance prevents the use of a box end wrench, you could get a slide handle. With the slide handle you can center the socket along the slide and use a hand on either end of the slide handle and apply a more even torque to the fastener.
Hope you heal soon.
 
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When I first used my chopper I was in fear of something like this. I was use to power tools that made noise signaling danger. The chopper was quiet.
Too late now, but always keep your hands above the blades when changing.
 

Rick Granick

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Thanks for all the suggestions, everybody. I have always been very vigilant when using the chopper or changing the blades. This really was a freak occurrence. The more I think about it, I really do think keeping the socket wrench seated on the shallow bolt head would be greatly aided by standing in a position in line with the way the bolt is facing (that is, 45 degrees to the fence), rather than standing directly in front of the chopper, which puts you at an angle to the direction of the bolt. Working at this angle would seem to increase the probability of what happened.

My hand is feeling better today. It seems I need to go easy on activities that involve hard gripping or squeezing (such as using manual point guns, etc.) until it has had a bit more time to start healing up, so as not to overstress the repair.

:cool: Rick

One kind of funny thing... I've been trying to brush my teeth left-handed, and unless I rest my right hand on something, it wants to move in time with what my left hand is doing. ;)
 

Rick Granick

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Larry Peterson

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David Hewitt

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David, what is a six point socket, and how does it differ from an ordinary socket?
As Larry posted in #19.
Also in the photos posted in #19, you will see that the face of the socket has a radius to help guide it on the bolt head, (or nut if be) that is what needs to be ground off, so that when used on a shallow headed bolt (or nut if be) you will have more bolt head surface area to grip too. Without making the socket a flush fit, the bolts on the chopper will have only about 1/16" of surface area to grip. Thus making it much easier to round off the edges of the bolt, or as in what happened to Rick, slip off entirely.
 
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Nikodeumus

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I'm not superstitious, but maybe I shouldn't have changed my chopper blades on Friday the 13th. Ended up spending 7 hours in the ER. I am very respectful of sharp things, and try to maintain strict awareness when using the chopper and especially when changing out the blades. This was just a freak thing, but while using the socket wrench that came with the unit so many years ago to tighten one of the retaining bolts on the left blade, the wrench somehow slipped off the bolt and the top of my hand ended up hitting the blade. Thinking back on how it could have happened, I think it would be wise to stand at an angle facing the blade while doing this, rather than right in front of the chopper as you do when using it. I believe this stance will help assure the socket sits straight on the bolt as it should. I think I will also purchase an extra-deep socket this size so that my hands are farther away from the blade when doing this task.
:cool: Rick

DON'T do this:
Whenever I damage myself I like to say: "If you aren't bleeding, you didn't try hard enough!"
Just to boost my ego and not acknowledge that I did an oopsy ;)
Or I tell myself that the girls will find my new scar sexy.
Problem with that theory is, I have gotten plenty of the former, but not so much of the later.
 

Rick Granick

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This is what I was using when this happened. It came with the chopper. I do have a regular socket set too, but that is 12-point.

IMG_0255.jpg
 

David Hewitt

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This is what I was using when this happened. It came with the chopper. I do have a regular socket set too, but that is 12-point.

View attachment 39379
The tool that came with the machine is a six point, but not of the best quality, but a few questions please:
Does it fit loosely or snugly on the bolt?
Does it fit flush, or are the face edges worn?
Are the bolt edges worn or rounded?
Do you hold the tool straight and firmly against the bolt? ( the tool is long, making it easy to slip off the bolt)

I had that tool, comes with the machine. I replaced it with a Snap-on 6 point, shallow depth ( about 1-1/8") Had the face ground for a flush fit, and used a 10" breaker bar, more for a safe distance than the tightening of the bolt. Also what's the condition of the bolts, are the edges rounded? You might consider a set of new ones from the manufacturer or a place like Fastenal. The bolts like the preferred socket should have a flat flush head.
 
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Rick Granick

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All great questions, David. The bolts themselves are in good condition, not rounded. The face of this tool is pretty flat, however as you say, it is not a great quality tool. It could definitely fit more snugly on the bolt heads. I think that factor, as well as standing at an angle to the face of the blade while working, probably combined to be the problem here. I plan to but a good quality 6-point socket to replace this. If I need to grind the face of the socket flat, can I do this on a grinding wheel like a bench grinder, or do I need to take it to a machine shop?
 

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All great questions, David. The bolts themselves are in good condition, not rounded. The face of this tool is pretty flat, however as you say, it is not a great quality tool. It could definitely fit more snugly on the bolt heads. I think that factor, as well as standing at an angle to the face of the blade while working, probably combined to be the problem here. I plan to but a good quality 6-point socket to replace this. If I need to grind the face of the socket flat, can I do this on a grinding wheel like a bench grinder, or do I need to take it to a machine shop?
When I work on these type of machines, to stay self, i use a battery powered impact driver or wrench. For light duty 3/8” works great and half inch for more robust stuff. The right socket with a long extension keeps my hands away from any danger. The turning of the bolt is handled by the driver while your hand controls the wrench and extension. You can also use a pneumatic driver since all of us have compressed air….also they are cheaper.
 
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CHolt

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Not good! Whenever I work with sharp objects, including glass, i always wear cutresistant gloves….saved my bacon a few times😃

I'm not superstitious, but maybe I shouldn't have changed my chopper blades on Friday the 13th. Ended up spending 7 hours in the ER. I am very respectful of sharp things, and try to maintain strict awareness when using the chopper and especially when changing out the blades. This was just a freak thing, but while using the socket wrench that came with the unit so many years ago to tighten one of the retaining bolts on the left blade, the wrench somehow slipped off the bolt and the top of my hand ended up hitting the blade. Thinking back on how it could have happened, I think it would be wise to stand at an angle facing the blade while doing this, rather than right in front of the chopper as you do when using it. I believe this stance will help assure the socket sits straight on the bolt as it should. I think I will also purchase an extra-deep socket this size so that my hands are farther away from the blade when doing this task.
:cool: Rick

DON'T do this:
Ouch! Sucks that happened to you. 10 days since and I'll bet it's still pretty sore. I did the same kind of thing many years ago installing a freshly sharpened lawnmower blade, 8 stitches to the base of my thumb, I've grazed the back of my thumb installing chopper blades too.

Thanks for sharing about it as a word of caution to all. No matter how many times one has performed the risky task the level of vigilance should never be lowered. I kind of think that this site could use a thread on safety topics.

A short length of pipe or a combination wrench can be used as an extender for that socket handle.
 

artfolio

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I always found the most dangerous moment during a blade change was when I undid the last bolt while holding the blade pinned against the head with my left thumb pressing into the bolt recess. Once I got a grip with both hands it was pretty easy.

Worst Morso story I heard was on an old thread here where someone was silly enough to wrap a pair of blades in bubble wrap and paper and post them away for sharpening. A postal worker was seriously injured handling the parcel and no doubt lawsuits followed.
 

CHolt

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I always found the most dangerous moment during a blade change was when I undid the last bolt while holding the blade pinned against the head with my left thumb pressing into the bolt recess. Once I got a grip with both hands it was pretty easy.

Worst Morso story I heard was on an old thread here where someone was silly enough to wrap a pair of blades in bubble wrap and paper and post them away for sharpening. A postal worker was seriously injured handling the parcel and no doubt lawsuits followed.
A rigid blade case is a must. Lay it out opened and close by the chopper BEFORE removing the blades. Then you can put the blade away safely without transferring from hand to hand or fumbling with a cover or even taking more than one or two steps.
 

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Thanks for sharing the pic.
I just bought a second hand Jyden chopper and seeing what's possible is the best way to learn without actually doing it myself.

I was cleaning up the underside of the machine when it arrived and managed a cut on the end of my thumb. I didn't even realise I'd touched the blade until I saw the blood. Thanks for the blade changing tips! Hopefully I don't lose my finger tips..
 

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Paul,

Welcome to the G family! :)
 
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Nikodeumus

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I'm OK, nobody send for the paramedics.
I managed to stay calm and didn't faint even a little bit. 😜
CM211018-152100003.jpg
OUCHY! WAAAAAA!!! :cry:
Even with plastic-coated wire I still manage to stab myself once in a while.:rolleyes:

OK fine, no big deal. But it stung like a "son of a bee sting"!🐝

On those occasions where a verbal outburst is required, I try to substitute fake swears while at work or in public.
When I injure myself I usually say "Son of a Bee Sting!", or "Son of a Biscuit!".
If something went wrong/broke I might use "Fiddle Sticks!", or "Pickles!"

What are some other fun SAFE FOR WORK expletives?
 

Rick Granick

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Yeah, puncture wounds can really sting. Since I work on my own, I wouldn't be shy about using the top shelf expletives. :icon11:
Welcome, Paul. Always respect those blades and maintain full awareness when using the machine. You should have a second set of blades to rotate to when you send these out for sharpening. I highly recommend TechMark in Little Rock, AK for the sharpening, and buy the wooden shipping box they offer. It will last forever, protect your blades, and avoid injuries like that described by Artfolio in post #27. (I was convinced to buy the box when my blades arrived back from sharpening with one end poked thru the styrofoam box and cardboard shipping cover.)

BTW, my hand is fine now, although I will have a battle scar to show for the experience.
:cool: Rick
 

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Larry Peterson

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I'm OK, nobody send for the paramedics.
I managed to stay calm and didn't faint even a little bit. 😜
View attachment 40143
OUCHY! WAAAAAA!!! :cry:
You call that a knife??????....................................Sorry thinking of the Crock Dundee thread. I get more blood that that daily when I check my blood sugar. 😜
😜 :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :faintthud: :faintthud: :vomit: :p
 
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