Barbed Wire in Wood Frame

Dancinbaer

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In a BB (Hobby Lobby), in a galaxie far far away (across town), in a time long past (about a year) I saw a ready made wood frame about that had barbed wire inlaid in the wood. They had several ready made sizes. Does anyone know of any molding manufactourers that make something like this for custom framing?
 

Ron Eggers

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Presto makes a barnwood frame in two widths with rope inlayed. Evald carries them in chop or length.

I haven't seen the barbed wire. It probably wouldn't be hard to make, but you'd have to go to Fleet Farm and buy 1000 feet of barbed wire.

You could use the extra to keep the neighborhood kids from cutting through your yard.
 

Jerry Ervin

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There is a company in Texas that sells these ready made barn wood frames with barb wire. I can get you there name and phone number if you need it. Instead, try this, Rustic Creations offers barn wood frames at a lower cost. You can also buy length from them, then add your own wire. I do this and it sells well on Cowboy and Southwest Art. Rustic Creations number is 800-410-3200. They are good people and easy to work with.

Tell them Jerry from Cedarwood Gallery sent you.
 

John Ranes II CPF GCF

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A bigger question is........WHY?

John
 

Sharonx

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I buy barnwood frames from Rustic Creations in Texas. I then add barbed wire, usually just on one corner. I also have put an old horseshoe on one corner. My customers like the look on western art. I have also seen them with fishing net, lures, and spent shotgun shells on the corner.
 

John Richards

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We also carry a line of barnwoods. Go to www.tcmoulding.com pages 18 and 19. Add your own wire. Any wire (non-galvanized) rusts quite nicely in a few weeks if left to the elements. Also, and I don't remember the site, but there is a company that sells old barbwire. I have heard that there are collectors of different designs.

John - isn't it obvious....you won't steal the stuff off the wall!
 

B. Newman

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Oh no!!! All I need is another business to get into!!! :eek: Do you know how much old rusted barbed wire (almost said "warr") there is lying all over this farm? Several thousand feet coiled up in different places.

Uh, anybody want some? ;)

betty
 

Dancinbaer

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Originally posted by John Ranes II, CPF, GCF:
A bigger question is........WHY?

John
John,
As the others implied, it goes nice with western theme art work, in my case it's a photo.

Thanks to all. You gave me an idea. I have a bunch of weathered barn board I kept after remodeling our basement just for frames. I work in a farming communitee so rusty barbed wire should be easy to come by. I guess I'll try making my own.
 

Framerguy

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Just take a hike in the woods in most any area of the Midwest and you will probably find (and sometimes trip over) old rusty barb wire left over from earlier times when the farmers ran their cattle on all their non-farming land.

I thought this trend had fallen by the wayside but it appears that it is still strong in certain parts of the country.

(I haven't seen a single BARB since moving down to the coast!!)

Framerguy
 
D

Dermot

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The Kansas
Barbed Wire
Museum

http://www.rushcounty.org/BarbedWireMuseum/


The Kansas Barbed Wire Museum in LaCrosse, Kansas is the only museum in the world devoted solely to the history and legend of what is often referred to as the "Devil’s Rope". On exhibit are over 1000 barbed wire varieties; including samples manufactured between the years 1870 and 1890. Hundreds of antique fencing tools represent the inventiveness of pioneers

[ 02-13-2004, 12:08 PM: Message edited by: Dermot ]
 

MerpsMom

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Dermot, how on earth in the world did you know that? Lots of folks know nothing about Kansas, and you know this? Thanx for that.


Betty, Grampa used to call it bobwarr. And we had it "laying" all over the place because Grampa was basically the most disorganized farmer/rancher you would ever meet. What a character.

[ 02-13-2004, 01:37 PM: Message edited by: MerpsMom ]
 

Rick Granick

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Three thoughts:
1) I understand about the Western art look and all, but the idea of using barbed wire just seems creepy to me.
2) The first time someone gets poked or cut on it, guess who they are going to blame.
3) That stuff would be h*ll on chopper blades!

:eek: Rick

P.S.: Once on NPR there was a story about the privatization of prisons. They mentioned a vendor who sells razor wire to these companies. The brandname was "Silent Swordsman".
 
D

Dermot

Guest
The Sunday Times (Irish Edition of the London one) had a supplement in it last Sunday about travelling to the US….for holidays…they mentioned the Barbed Wire Museum as a place to go and have a look at…they rated it a good attraction.

John I was brought up on a farm……lots of Barbed Wire…….and until we moved into our current house the boundary was of Barbed Wire….I took it out because of the kids…….still lots of barbed Wire around where I live now…..it’s sheep country …….and I caught a bit of a Discovery channel program recently which was about Barbed Wire…….from what I can gather Barbed Wire was a technology invention of it’s time to match the best……and has had huge social implications…..

Rgs
 

Reynard

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i had to make a frame for an artist once that had barbed wire incorporated into it as well.He was painting a scene from Aushwitz concentration camp that he had visited.The frame was an integral part of the actual painting and I had to work closely with him at all stages of the job.I also had to help him put those ceramic things from telegraph poles into the painting as well.

It hangs in the Polish embassy in London at the moment if you want to see it.Harrowing doesnt come close to describing the finished painting.
 

Reynard

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Yeah Rick it was a fantastic piece of work.Not at all meant to be pretty obviously.

The artist had been on holiday in Poland about ten years previously and had basically wandered into Auchswitz which has been preserved as a holocaust memorial.He was a full time artist at this point in time painting the usual kind of potboilers to earn a crust.

He was pretty badly moved as most of us would be at what he saw there and started to paint what he felt about the pace.I saw many of his sketchbooks that he did at the time and its clear that he was being moved to paint this.It cost him his marriage and his livelihood as he simply couldnt go back to painting soulless rubbish for the middle class art browser that had been his stock in trade.

He had to take a paid job simply to get by.I can remeber him coming in to my old workplace on a monday morning first thing and his fingers were bleeding from painting all weekend.This went on for around ten years until one of the dealers got wind of what was going on and visited him.He was asked to display his work at the local municipal gallery but everone was scared to show this kind of work.It is obviously leaving everyone open to the charge of sensationalism because of the subject matter.

He was pretty keen to avoid this and he actually went to Glasgow to ask a Rabbi called Ernest Levi what he thought of this.

It turned out thet Ernest himself had been in the camp as a young boy and had lost his entire family there as well.There were around thirty other survivors of the camp in Glasgow at the time.They asked the artist up to talk to them about it all and at the end they gave their blessing to him to go ahead which was obviously very important to him.There were around fifty camp survivors at the opening of that exhibition and Mr Levy gave a talk to open it.It was one of the most moving things I have ever been at.It was just good to have been involved with something like that and to meet people who had been through such a meeting with evil.
 
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