Backlit Stained Glass Windows

Dave

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Jun 11, 2004
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13,355
From
Edwardsburg, MI
I'm working on a project framing two stained glass windows with LJ #651730 which is an oak mldg. approx. 3" deep. The customer will be hanging these on a wall instead of suspending them in a window and wishes to have them backlit.

The boxes will measure about 27.5" X 30.5"

In considering different light sources, I've kind of centered on LED rope lights. They supposedly burn for 100,000 hours with little electrical draw and burn very cool requiring little if any venting. They take 120V. Battery powered lights are not an option.

I found them available on the web made to custom sizes for around $ 68.00 each.

My concerns are:

1.) Eveness of lighting. I planned on attaching the lights around the inside perimeter of the frame with a slight sheilding if neccessary to hide the lights...possible backing the box with foil covered fom-cor as a reflector.

2.) Cost efficency.

3.) Heat buildup.

4.) Long term reliability.


Any input into whether this or another lighting method would be best?

Thanks for your input.

Dave Makielski
 

TheDoctah

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Aug 10, 2005
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NH
I'm a little skeptical of perimeter lighting making for even illumination. Seems to me the drop off will be significant as you move from the perimeter towards the center. I'd be more inclined to use the flexible properties of the rope lighting to make a serpentine or coil effect over the full area of the window, coupled with some sort of translucent acrylic to diffuse the light and make it illuminate more evenly. I think the idea of LED rope lighting is a good idea.
 

eagle55

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Aug 8, 2005
Posts
73
From
Sioux City, IA
I did one that I backed in mirror and used a ceiling mounted spot light focused on the upper part of the glass and it turned out wonderfully. Customer was very pleased as it went into a bathroom with no windows. The light could then be hard wired into a switch for convienence.
 

framah

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death star driver
The Doctah is correct. Perimeter lighting will not give an even illumination. A piece of milky, translucent plexi behind the stained glass will help diffuse the light.

Foil behind the lights will only give you more hot spots. Look at any fluorescent fixture in your ceiling. It has a white background... for a reason. Also notice the fixtures have diffusers in front of the tubes.

The idea is to have as few dark areas between the lights as possible so snaking the tubes would help. Even tho they give off little heat, you still need to vent the box as heat WILL build up, just slower than an incandescent light would.

Two small inserts of the type that are used for venting soffits on a house would work. Two on the bottom and two on the top. Normal convection currents will be enough to keep this thing from over heating. No need for a whisper fan.
 

framah

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????? What is that going to do??? Please explain what mounting 1" away from a mirror will do for him??
 

Dave

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Thread starter
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Edwardsburg, MI
I believe that snaking or spiraling the light rope, putting thin white plexi in front as a defuser and backing with white would be more effective at eliminating hotspots. This makes sense when you compare the project to the design of a light box used in the graphic arts.

The backing with mirror and spotting from the ceiling is intriguing also.

I'll need to confer with my customer and see which approach they like.

Thanks all for the input.

Dave Makielski
 

Baer Charlton

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May 24, 2004
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On FB
Whoa! How cool is THAT!?

I just was reading how GE has contracted with a small company that perfected an invisible LCD that can be screened onto a window for advertizing that changes....

Now they want an LED so that a window can become an ambiant light source at night or glow softly to enhance light production on gloomy days.

man it's great to be alive watching all this.
 

CAframer

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Joined
Nov 19, 2003
Posts
3,834
From
Orange County, CA
I'm working on a project framing two stained glass windows with LJ #651730 which is an oak mldg. approx. 3" deep. The customer will be hanging these on a wall instead of suspending them in a window and wishes to have them backlit.

The boxes will measure about 27.5" X 30.5"

In considering different light sources, I've kind of centered on LED rope lights. They supposedly burn for 100,000 hours with little electrical draw and burn very cool requiring little if any venting. They take 120V. Battery powered lights are not an option.

I found them available on the web made to custom sizes for around $ 68.00 each.

My concerns are:

1.) Eveness of lighting. I planned on attaching the lights around the inside perimeter of the frame with a slight sheilding if neccessary to hide the lights...possible backing the box with foil covered fom-cor as a reflector.

2.) Cost efficency.

3.) Heat buildup.

4.) Long term reliability.


Any input into whether this or another lighting method would be best?

Thanks for your input.

Dave Makielski


Dave

How did you end up handling this? Was it a success? Were there any issues? I have a similar project to do hence my questions.

Thanks
Andrew
 

BILL WARD

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Joined
Mar 25, 2004
Posts
2,451
From
Tampa, FL
Dave,
I have a good working relationship with a guy-Burton Mcneely---owns Creative Color in Tampa, FL...does print making, etc and has done/does a LOT of tradeshow display stuff for people around the US.....you might give him a call(he's not into email) @813-289-4385 and discuss what you want/need done. Tell him I sic'd you on him! bet he has 1 or 2 good ideas on the subject
 
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