Auto Body Rubbing Compound

Shayla

WOW Framer
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Unless it's a great idea I've just never happened to hear touted on here, can someone please explain why we don't use auto body rubbing compound to try hiding scratches on matte black moulding. It's been suggested today, and my response would be a lot more convincing if I had agreement from those who know more. (Which is a very large group.) So, if you'd be willing to explain your thoughts on the subject, I'd appreciate it very much. I know someone recommended something else on here a few days ago, but I'm too tired to remember, and wasn't that just for buffing finishes, not for trying to remove scratches? So far as I know, there's not really anything that can hide scratches in the finish of a matte black wood. Thanks.
 
Nope! It doesn't work.

Firstly, rubbing compound polishes the finish so if you want a nice, shiny finish go for it.

Secondly, it removes paint and most mouldings are painted pretty thinly so by the time you removed the scratch you would have removed most of the paint and, probably a fair bit of the compo.

Generally, if a plain matt black moulding is scratched the only cure is to recut the damaged rail or replace the whole frame.
 
Toothpaste will do the same thing but less abrasive. Might end up with a shine but give it a try.
 
The framer who first trained me used toothpaste to hide fine scratches on some metals, but I haven't used it on wood. Although, I do have a vague memory of trying it and finding it didn't work. At least our frames would smell minty fresh.
 
White paste is more abrasive than the colored gels. They were commonly used in the 80's and 90's for the lacquer finished stain woods and painted items. The only metals they would work on is the painted ones.

Tartar control paste is the most abrasive of them all.
 
Toothpaste used to have microgranules in it as a polishing agent. I think those were found to not be good for us or the environment and are not included in toothpaste anymore. Maybe if you can find Pearl Drops toothpaste it may have grit in it still.
 
Also, if using toothpaste as polish, the baking soda versions might have a good amount of "grit" to them. On that thought, I wonder what a simple baking soda and water paste would do as a polish...hmm...
 
I know someone recommended something else on here a few days ago, but I'm too tired to remember, and wasn't that just for buffing finishes, not for trying to remove scratches? So far as I know, there's not really anything that can hide scratches in the finish of a matte black wood. Thanks.

I think that it may have been mentioned on my thread regarding puttying corners of matte black wood frames. The most interesting thing I saw on there was the "polishing papers" which seem to be like a sort of sandpaper cloth.

The links provided were this one:
http://www.cooltools.us/3M-Polishing-Papers-Set-p/pol-100.htm
And this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Zona-37-948-P...446926708&sr=8-1&keywords=3m+polishing+papers
 
I just ordered the ones on Amazon. I currently use Mr. Clean Magic Eraser on Matte Black frames. It works fine on them but not on other frames. Will try this stuff out on a bunch of mouldings and report back.
 
Thank you, Kat! That was it.
 
To remove light scratches from moulding I use Novus #2 Fine Scratch Remover that is used to remove fine scratches on acrylic. I put it on and rub it in a circular motion, let it dry, and wipe it off. If it is a matte finished black moulding it will make the spot shinny so I go over the shinny portion quickly with Adhesive Release that I purchase at TC Moulding here in Minneapolis/St Paul. It works well unless the scratches are deep - if that's the case I cut a new piece and don't even mess with trying to remove the scratch.
 
Unless it's a great idea I've just never happened to hear touted on here, can someone please explain why we don't use auto body rubbing compound to try hiding scratches on matte black moulding. It's been suggested today, and my response would be a lot more convincing if I had agreement from those who know more. (Which is a very large group.) So, if you'd be willing to explain your thoughts on the subject, I'd appreciate it very much. I know someone recommended something else on here a few days ago, but I'm too tired to remember, and wasn't that just for buffing finishes, not for trying to remove scratches? So far as I know, there's not really anything that can hide scratches in the finish of a matte black wood. Thanks.
Shayla, just a thought regarding your description of "scratches on matte black moulding/matte black wood." IF said scratches did not remove the blackness of the finish, only litely mar its surface, instead of attempting to remove the annoying scratches (as everybody else has suggested), why not simply fill them in with some matte black paint, & prior to total curing of the paint, level it out with its appropriate solvent & let total cure then? This suggestion, however, wouldn't work if the scratches went against the grain, only with it --- though it would also work on painted metal.
 
Unless it's a great idea I've just never happened to hear touted on here, can someone please explain why we don't use auto body rubbing compound to try hiding scratches on matte black moulding. It's been suggested today, and my response would be a lot more convincing if I had agreement from those who know more. (Which is a very large group.) So, if you'd be willing to explain your thoughts on the subject, I'd appreciate it very much. I know someone recommended something else on here a few days ago, but I'm too tired to remember, and wasn't that just for buffing finishes, not for trying to remove scratches? So far as I know, there's not really anything that can hide scratches in the finish of a matte black wood. Thanks.
If it's an actual scratch, I'd try Novus 2 fine scratch remover for plexi. Yes, it will likely leave you with a shiny surface, but I came up with a great trick for that. Take your tin of black corner wax and pour some Bestine or Undo into it, then swirl a paper towel in it. It will leave black wax and damp thinner on the paper towel. Now just wipe down the edge of the frame and watch it dull right back down. May take a bit of experimenting, but it works great. If it's just shiny spots from handling, skip right to the besting and black corner filler.
 
Shayla, just a thought regarding your description of "scratches on matte black moulding/matte black wood." IF said scratches did not remove the blackness of the finish, only litely mar its surface, instead of attempting to remove the annoying scratches (as everybody else has suggested), why not simply fill them in with some matte black paint, & prior to total curing of the paint, level it out with its appropriate solvent & let total cure then? This suggestion, however, wouldn't work if the scratches went against the grain, only with it --- though it would also work on painted metal.
Also, as an "addendum" to the above, you could try using epoxy putty sticks (hand kneadable, fast setting polymer compound for permanent wood repairs) --- "staining" what you'd be using with a black matt acrylic (or other paint colorant) if said sticks don't come in matt black, the epoxy "smoothed" into the wood to make the scratches visually virtually indiscernible from the rest of the substrate. If enough care is taken with the aforementioned procedure, it should work. (Howe'er, I'd suggest a little learning-curve-experimentation with the method prior to actually applying it where intended.)
 
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