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Air Purifiers

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Shayla

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Before buying an air purifier, it's a good idea to read the owners manual. They're often available online, and worth the time. Our shop purifier just came, and it has some unexpected cautions in the manual. Things like, don't use it in a humid room, or where it might come in contact with steam. Don't use it in greasy or damp environments, near fireplaces, or in areas where flammable or combustive materials are present. Following the humidity caution, the manual says it's not to be used in bathrooms or laundry rooms. Also, don't ever touch it's cord with wet hands (which applies to all electrical cords, but still good to mention).

It needs two feet of space between the purifiers intake/outlet and the wall. Also says that inverter lighting equipment or electronic light fixtures may interfere with remote control signals, and to avoid storing the remote in direct sunlight, as heat may interfere with remote control signals. I had no idea that most of these were even a thing. I knew not to set it on fire, but not something like, 'stay away from flammable fumes'. It's true that owner's manuals have to list every insane thing to cover their hineys from future lawsuits, but in this case, it might be good to listen.

It's also good to read up on product performance and safety. Purifiers vary greatly in quality and function, with some being more safe than others. Some generate so much ozone that it creates indoor pollution equivalent to smoke a pack a day. These can also trigger, or even cause, asthma. Some poorly made purifiers generate so much that this is especially harmful. Several years ago, I bought a purifier at a yard sale and brought it home. Was excited to have clean air, and ran it next to where I slept. After a few days, I started feeling weird. Kind of dizzy, and a strange sensation that I couldn't describe, but wasn't good. Had a hard time figuring it out until I noticed the purifier. Unplugged it and the problem went away. It was such a crummy feeling that I threw the purifier away. Didn't want to pass the problem along to another user.

I had considered buying two smaller units, from another source, and highly rated. But in reading reviews, it said that their 'plasma wave technology' can worsen asthma, so I kept shopping.

The one we just bought for the shop, from RabbitAir, is highly rated. It has an ozone generator, which creates much less than is considered dangerous in California. (Because California often leads the country on product safety guidelines). The great thing is, the ozone generator can be turned off, and the machine still works. I called and asked what the ozone does, and was told it makes air particles heavier, so they fall to the floor. So, with it on, air is being sucked in, and particles in the room fall more quickly. With it off, they float around longer. It also has charcoal pellets, instead of charcoal impregnated fibers, in the filter. The pellets have much more surface area than a simple fiber filter.

One can also find completely ozone-free purifiers. I don't know how quiet those are, (that was a selling point with ours), but for some, it's worth the trade-off.

Lastly, a caution: Right now, everyone is buying purifiers. When we first looked for another brand, they were all out of stock. I finally found one for about a hundred dollars more and was very relieved. About to buy, then I remembered to check out the buyer. Doing a search for online reviews and site legitimacy showed it was a scam. So, always remember to vet the buyer.
 
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Shayla

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P.S. When I ordered ours, I didn't know that they make four customized air filters. Our unit came with the 'odor remover' filter, and today, I noticed that they also make a 'Germ Defense' filter. I called the company and ordered one of these, instead. With a little research, that great product you're about to buy could be even better. :)
 
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David Waldmann

Herder of cats
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Reminds me of the disclaimer on some sheetrock tape I bought a few years ago "not fit for any particular purpose".

Riiiiight. So why did you make it, why are you selling it, and why do you expect me to buy it?

Anyways, I bought it, used it, and it fit my purpose, so go blow down some other arthropod.
 

cjmst3k

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
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Apr 25, 2006
Messages
4,397
We've had a MedifyAir MA-112 and when I was dremeling something, and smoke went in the air, the normally blue light turned red, the numbers which usually read 006 went to 999, and the thing automatically detected smoke, ramped up speed, and cleared the smoke out in a few minutes. I highly recommend it. We moved ours to the front counter when Covid started. It gets down to 0.1 microns, and from my understanding Covid is 0.12 microns.
 

wpfay

Comfort Badger
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Jacksonville Beach, FL USA
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Sunshine Frames

We don't have an air filter, other than the ones in the A/C unit. Weather has been tolerable so the windows have been wide open.
Only kind of filter we need now is a bug filter. They use UV light as well, though they aren't as particular about where they are placed. just don't stick your finger in when it's on.
 
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