Question About crack of canvas.

cheonmu

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Hello.

I recently received an oil painting from a painter by delivery.

The painting was rollied in the box, but when I opened painting, I saw a crack like below picture.

crasss.jpg

crrr1.jpg

I think the cause of cracks is temperature.

Recently, S.Korea recorded an average of -10 degrees Celsius.

But i don't know this problem is solely due to the temperature.

Could someone tell me why canvas has cracks like this and how to prevent cracks?

Thank you.
 

wpfay

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Rapid environment changes could be part of the cause of the cracking. The canvas and paints will contract or expand, and not necessarily at the same rate.

Proper handling of canvases would require a supportive tube (the larger the diameter, the better) that the canvas is rolled on (face out), a sheet of glassine or some other non-stick protection over the image to keep the pigments from sticking to the back of the canvas, and a protective layer rolled on the outside of the rolled canvas, even if it is just craft paper. That in turn is put in a larger tube or box, with sufficient padding so it doesn't move around, for shipping

Rolling the canvas with the face of the painting out is less stressful on the pigments. If the pigments are face in, they can compress and stick to each other. This is what I think happened with this particular painting. The sudden temperature shift from ambient indoor temperatures to sub-freezing certainly wouldn't help.
 

Echobelly

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It's hard to tell how thick the paint is, but unless it's very thinly painted, oil paint will crack when rolled. It's not flexible like acrylic. I recently had to unstretch and roll a fairly thickly painted oil painting for shipping. I explained to the artist that the paint was going to crack and damage the painting. She didn't care, she had sold it and the owners didn't want to pay for shipping stretched. As I rolled it over a fairly large tube, I could hear the paint crack, and some even chipped off.
 

Nikodeumus

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I explained to the artist that the paint was going to crack and damage the painting. She didn't care, she had sold it and the owners didn't want to pay for shipping stretched. As I rolled it over a fairly large tube, I could hear the paint crack, and some even chipped off.
Once again I ask, "HOW are "artists" being trained with absolutely no idea of what to do with their work once the last brush stroke is done."??!?!
There is so much more for an artist to know about what happens with their artwork after it comes off the easel/drawing board/craft table.
Some examples: proper finishing, how to package/transport, how to frame, long-term care, etc. etc.
I know many "artists" are self-taught.
But there has to be some degree of personal responsibility for someone who is charging money for something they are not fully knowledgeable about.
That artist in Echobelly's example should refund their customer's money, as it is likely they will have received a painting in poorer condition than when they paid for it.
 

wpfay

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Once again I ask, "HOW are "artists" being trained with absolutely no idea of what to do with their work once the last brush stroke is done."??!?!
There is so much more for an artist to know about what happens with their artwork after it comes off the easel/drawing board/craft table.
Some examples: proper finishing, how to package/transport, how to frame, long-term care, etc. etc.
I know many "artists" are self-taught.
I have a BFA in scientific illustration. Framing, both technical and aesthetic, may have had about 5 minutes of coverage in my four year course of study. That was specific to senior year students exhibiting their work in the school gallery, and mostly covered mat size (3" top and sides, 3 1/2" bottom) and color (white) so the exhibit would look "professional". The pieces were displayed with no framing or gazing.
I was lucky that I had exposure to framing through the shop that I now own.
Art was the focus and most of the students did educate themselves to some of the basics of framing, but the teachers were giving out some information that was obviously simply passed on from one to another and had no research behind it (using gummed craft packing tape to hinge the art, etc.).
It is rare that an artist comes in before creating something to talk about the feasibility of framing. It has happened, but no more than a handful in the 40+ years I've been at this.
I did get invited to speak to the local Photography club about framing. I prepared a 20 minute talk with plenty of time for Q&A. When I arrived and looked at the display of their works, I had to ditch the plans and start with basic design theories. Some of the photography was good, but it was hard to say because of the poor framing. I thought it went well. I haven't been invited back.
 

Nikodeumus

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You did what you could Wally.
At least we do have a few artists here on The G who are trying to self educate themselves about displaying their artwork.
Hopefully, they will be the leaders in a revolution in art education!
Learn Schitts Creek GIF by CBC
 

Echobelly

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Once again I ask, "HOW are "artists" being trained with absolutely no idea of what to do with their work once the last brush stroke is done."??!?!
There is so much more for an artist to know about what happens with their artwork after it comes off the easel/drawing board/craft table.
Some examples: proper finishing, how to package/transport, how to frame, long-term care, etc. etc.
I know many "artists" are self-taught.
But there has to be some degree of personal responsibility for someone who is charging money for something they are not fully knowledgeable about.
That artist in Echobelly's example should refund their customer's money, as it is likely they will have received a painting in poorer condition than when they paid for it.
I got the impression neither she nor her customers noticed or cared about the damage. Previously she had me unstretch some fairly large paintings, where the sides were painted too, and ship them, with the stretchers in another tube so the next framer could put the stretchers back together to re-stretch. I couldn't imagine that shipping them stretched would have cost that much more than having them re-stretched. Unfortunately, the tube with the stretchers arrived but not the tube with the paintings.... luckily we weren't responsible for the shipping.
 

cheonmu

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Was the oil painting properly cured? Does it feel sticky anywhere? True oil painting, or acrylic?
Hi, Thanks for answering.

When I asked the artist, he said only painted using oil painting and dried well.

When I touch the painting, paint does not sticky.

After talking with artist, we decided that this painting was unusable.

And I put painting next to my stove for heat, but painting still didn't straighten out.
 

cheonmu

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Rapid environment changes could be part of the cause of the cracking. The canvas and paints will contract or expand, and not necessarily at the same rate.

Proper handling of canvases would require a supportive tube (the larger the diameter, the better) that the canvas is rolled on (face out), a sheet of glassine or some other non-stick protection over the image to keep the pigments from sticking to the back of the canvas, and a protective layer rolled on the outside of the rolled canvas, even if it is just craft paper. That in turn is put in a larger tube or box, with sufficient padding so it doesn't move around, for shipping

Rolling the canvas with the face of the painting out is less stressful on the pigments. If the pigments are face in, they can compress and stick to each other. This is what I think happened with this particular painting. The sudden temperature shift from ambient indoor temperatures to sub-freezing certainly wouldn't help.

Hi,

Surely, painting arrived in a very narrow tube.

Artist used a small tube, painting were more rollied in tube.

I told the artist to send using a tube as large as possible.

Thank you for your help.
 

cheonmu

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It's hard to tell how thick the paint is, but unless it's very thinly painted, oil paint will crack when rolled. It's not flexible like acrylic. I recently had to unstretch and roll a fairly thickly painted oil painting for shipping. I explained to the artist that the paint was going to crack and damage the painting. She didn't care, she had sold it and the owners didn't want to pay for shipping stretched. As I rolled it over a fairly large tube, I could hear the paint crack, and some even chipped off.
Hi, Thanks for answering.

I have received many oil paintings from various artists, but I am not sure about the standard of "thick".

Some artists used oil paintings to express a thickness of more than 1 cm, while others artists painted them with a thickness similar to that of watercolor or acrylic(thin).

Even in the case, I personally thought it was thin, but how thin is "very thin" you mentioned in the comments?
 

Nikodeumus

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When I asked the artist, he said only painted using oil painting and dried well.

When I touch the painting, paint does not sticky.
How long is "well dried"?

There is a difference between "dry to the touch" and an oil painting being cured.

Here is a quote from a website it took me 1 minute to look for:
"When the painting is complete and you have allowed up to seven days drying time, it is still not necessarily dry for framing. The process of using oil-based paint can be a tedious one, because only six months to a year after completion can you begin to seal or frame your work."
And this:
"As they consist of multiple heavy paint layers, oil paintings will not dry like other paint products. Oils oxidize and begin curing as a reaction to air and due to this process, they dry from the top layer down and often take far longer to dry effectively. Between 6 to 12 months is the recommended time allowance before beginning to varnish or frame your canvas."

I would suggest sharing some of the advice given here for them to learn better methods in the future.
 

05

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Paintings, prints -even rugs- should be rolled with the face/media side out. The inside of the roll is smaller than the outside by a factor of 3.14159. So, if the media is going to flake off, the edges of the flakes may well get crushed. with the media outside, it has to stretch, so any flakes will probably be whole & can glued back down, and any cracks will close up. Glassine or somesuch between the layers, please.



If you’ve a 30’ x 8’ newly lined WPA mural on canvas to roll onto a 24” Sono tube (tubes made for casting concrete columns), between flipping it over & getting it rolled will take more than 2 people, probably close to 2 hours. Trust me on this. 05.
 

artfolio

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To my eye those creases on the rear view look like those you see near the end of a roll of canvas or where pressure or possibly small pieces of carp trapped in the roll have been left for a long time. That piece of canvas should have been discarded or used for a brush wiper, not painted on.
 
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