A little technique needed...

clifpa

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Hi all,

My customer has a very nice Giclee on canvas he wants framed and protected with glazing.

If I use a spacer between the art and the glazing I'm afraid this, over time, will leave a ring around the art, so was wondering how you folks have handled this?

Is there a special spacer used for this?

best, Cliff (not to be confused with Cliff Wilson...wink or :D )
 

MerpsMom

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Hope this doesn't stir up more on giclees.


Good question, though. Since obviously something has to hold up the glass, I use either Framespace which touches minimally, or Arlo which just plain touches the art. Or 8+ply rag cut into spacers.

Brian Wolf once said framers have the strongest hands in the world: I think he's right. Just don't "squarsh" it with points when fitting.
 

Fredrick Lane

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The did one of these a few weeks ago and this was my deal:

I framed the giclee' with a linen liner for starters. When we installed the linen liner in the frame, we put the glass in FIRST. Then the linen liner. This provided the necessary seperation. It looks really good with the liner
behind the glass and protects the giclee' and the LINER wonderfully. A solution to this problem as well as NO MORE SOILED LINEN LINERS.
 

Baer Charlton

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I'll second Fredrick.

And it is the perfect sell for Museum Glass.

Actually, I would NOT have said Linen Liner, I would have said "Liner wrapped in one of the over 685 fabrics from Frank".... but that's just me. :D
 

HannaFate

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Anything on canvas has the problem of firm contact with its framing around the edges. All you can do is make sure that what touches it is gentle. Fabric is good.
Paper is good. Plastic would be my last choice, because it would eventually stick to the coating on the print.
 

wpfay

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There is a product designed specifically for this application that would be used to face the inside edge (the one in contact with the art) called Volara Foam. Available in sheets or 1/4" wide rolls with adhesive backing from Talasonline, or University Products.

Used in conjunction with any shim or spacer you might use.

Option 1: attach black foamboard strips to the side of the stretcher bar so they extend 1/4" out from the face of the Giclee and use them as glass spacers.
 

wpfay

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Wish I had thought of it...learned it on the G. Just can't remember who deserves the credit.
 

froptop

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excellent suggestion Wally, to you and to whom it may concern.

And if I understand you correctly, it's important when using this technique to add that additional thickness of the foamboard to the L and W of the stretched canvas when measuring for frame size
 

BUDDY

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Wally I don't think it is the same product ,but I rememeber a long time ago when discussing glazing Oils, Orton suggested attaching strips of rag matting to the sides of the strecher frame at a hieght just higher than the tllest oil peak on the canvass( I forget the ply) and resting the glass on top of these strips.

However in prepairing Shadowboxes I often attach strips of matting and fom-core to the insides of the frame after inserting the glazing and then resting the work on the edge provided by theses strips. It seems that this proces wood work just as well for canvasses if they were much smaller.IMHO
BUDDY
 

Rick Granick

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Buddy, if I understand all this correctly, the difference would be that with Wally's method the bottom of the spacers do not rest on the canvas surface, but are attached to its sides. This would require a slightly larger frame size, but it avoids marring the art's surface. For shadow boxes, I use the same technique you described, beacuse the only thing resting on the spacer bottoms is the outer 1/4" or so of the backing mat's face.
:cool: Rick
 

Sherry Lee

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Anyone tried Option 1????

There is a product designed specifically for this application that would be used to face the inside edge (the one in contact with the art) called Volara Foam. Available in sheets or 1/4" wide rolls with adhesive backing from Talasonline, or University Products.

Used in conjunction with any shim or spacer you might use.

Option 1: attach black foamboard strips to the side of the stretcher bar so they extend 1/4" out from the face of the Giclee and use them as glass spacers.

HAS ANYONE TRIED THIS? I read the entire thread and I did not see what is used to attach the foamboard to the side of the stretcher bar. I would like to try this. I just stretched one of those thick, 'plasticy canvases' - you know the kind, it hardly bends - over the stretcher bars (recommended by gallery) and I'm going to use glass. Obviously we can't use tape or adhesive on the canvas. And I'd think the foamboard would deteriorate (over time) from the weight of the glass if staples or screws were used.

Thank you!
 

Hired Help

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Sherry,

Yes, I have tried this with matboard, not with foamcore. A few staples will hold the matboard to the sides of the piece. It works great. Just remember to allow for the width of the matboard when sizing the frame and the glass has to be cut to the outside matboard dimensions or slightly greater.

Clive.
 

Framerguy

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Destin, Florida
Hi all,

My customer has a very nice Giclee on canvas he wants framed and protected with glazing.

If I use a spacer between the art and the glazing I'm afraid this, over time, will leave a ring around the art, so was wondering how you folks have handled this?

Is there a special spacer used for this?

best, Cliff (not to be confused with Cliff Wilson...wink or :D )

Response deleted!

Edit:

That will be a lesson for me not to dive into a post without that first cup of coffee in the morning!! This entire thread was 2 years old and I didn't notice it until now!! Duh!

Sherry, ya gotta warn people when you sneak in an old post!!! :kaffeetrinker_2::kaffeetrinker_2:

To answer your question, no, I haven't tried that method of attachment.
 

Sherry Lee

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What is the best way to warn??

Response deleted!

Edit:

That will be a lesson for me not to dive into a post without that first cup of coffee in the morning!! This entire thread was 2 years old and I didn't notice it until now!! Duh!

Sherry, ya gotta warn people when you sneak in an old post!!! :kaffeetrinker_2::kaffeetrinker_2:

To answer your question, no, I haven't tried that method of attachment.

Framerguy,
I understand why you said that. I almost started a new thread, discussing the method of putting foamboard around the canvas. I was afraid that, because there were already 'old' responses, folks wouldn't look at it. THANK YOU for looking!

Is there a way to indicate that it is 'picked up' old thread, other than to just state so??

I think I will start a fresh one because I need to hear what has worked for others.

Now, back to your coffee. I'm going to go get my first one any minute now!
 

Jim Miller

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When glazing a canvas, I like to use a floater frame at least 1/8" deeper than the stretched canvas. The new Nielsen 13 series is good for the purpose, but I used to use aluminum 1" or 1-1/4" right-angle stock, painted with black acrylic spray. The angle stock or floater frame is screwed to the back of the stretcher bars in the usual way.

Then I put Volara foam or glue thin strips of matboard on the top edge of the floater, lay glass on that padded edge, and use an outer frame that covers the floater's edges. That makes a pretty deep assembly, so if the outer frame is not deep enough to enclose the whole thickness, I'll stack two mouldings or add a backbox.

This framing design shows all edges of the stretched canvas, and there is no contact of framing materials with the painted surface. Pictures and details are in the October 2006 issue of PFM, page 60, "To Glaze Or Not To Glaze".
 

Sherry Lee

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Phoenix, Az.
Thank you Jim!

The customer chose a 'meaty' Roma moulding, unfortunately, not a floater type frame.

I appreciate the article reference and will pull it now.

Have a great time in Vegas - see you at WCAF!
 
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