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3d Printer Racing Stripes

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Mike Labbe

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Get The Picture
I was home for the past couple weeks, and bored.

I gave our original Ender 3 printer a facelift/re-build, with some "Racing Stripes" (orange inserts), a new fan cover, a belt cover, an extruder knob, a tool drawer, a new BTT E3 v2.0 32 bit motherboard (replaced factory 8 bit board), and a new BTT TFT35 color touch screen interface (to replace the one color text based display from factory). All the orange bits and the drawer, I printed on the machine. The extruder (red) was recently replaced from the plastic one that came with it, to a stronger aluminum unit. I previously upgraded the bed springs and bowden tube.

It is now running the newest Marlin operating system.

3d-update.png

Do any other grumbler have or use 3d printers? If so, what updates have you done to yours?
 

cvm

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Haha the QR Code works from my screen.
 

Mike Labbe

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ha
 

Larry Peterson

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QR code works for me too.
 

Mike Labbe

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When I was taking the picture, a box kept popping up that read the QR and wanted to take me to that website. ha
 
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Rick Hennen

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Rian Fabrication Services
I was home for the past couple weeks, and bored.

I gave our original Ender 3 printer a facelift/re-build, with some "Racing Stripes" (orange inserts), a new fan cover, a belt cover, an extruder knob, a tool drawer, a new BTT E3 v2.0 32 bit motherboard (replaced factory 8 bit board), and a new BTT TFT35 color touch screen interface (to replace the one color text based display from factory). All the orange bits and the drawer, I printed on the machine. The extruder (red) was recently replaced from the plastic one that came with it, to a stronger aluminum unit. I previously upgraded the bed springs and bowden tube.

It is now running the newest Marlin operating system.

View attachment 36389

Do any other grumbler have or use 3d printers? If so, what updates have you done to yours?
Mike,

In our CNC work, we use a CAD software to create the design we require, then using a post processor within the software, we convert the design into a gcode format that is specific to my machine. I use a software called Mach3 to actually run the machine and the gcode format is actually a .dat file. Mach 3 is used to run almost any CNC machine as long as you set up the necessary parameters of the machine being used. The reason I went through the winded explanation above is that I am very interested in possibly adding 3D printing to my services and I am trying to determine if the current software I am using can also be applied to 3D printing. If not, is the necessary software similar enough to minimize the learning curve?
 

Mike Labbe

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3D printing is very easy, as long as the models are designed within the capabilities of the machine. The Slicer (the program that converts it to a .gcode file, specific to the machine) has options, where you can also optionally control the infill density, whether or not you need supports, etc. I will usually import *.stl files into my slicer, to generate the .gcode result file.

It doesn't sound very different from what you are doing.

If you are also working with that format, you could download a free CURA program from Ultimaker, to see what happens. If you specify that you have a printer, such as the Creality Ender 3 Pro, it will take it all the way to generating a preview of what it will look like as a final product. Any problem areas will turn red.

Mike
 

Rick Hennen

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3D printing is very easy, as long as the models are designed within the capabilities of the machine. The Slicer (the program that converts it to a .gcode file, specific to the machine) has options, where you can also optionally control the infill density, whether or not you need supports, etc. I will usually import *.stl files into my slicer, to generate the .gcode result file.

It doesn't sound very different from what you are doing.

If you are also working with that format, you could download a free CURA program from Ultimaker, to see what happens. If you specify that you have a printer, such as the Creality Ender 3 Pro, it will take it all the way to generating a preview of what it will look like as a final product. Any problem areas will turn red.

Mike
.stl files are also common in CNC production. We import them into our 3d design software, open them and then using the post processor (same as your Slicer) the file is converted to the gcode for our machine. I think I will downlaod the Cura program and do some experimenting. Thank You
 

Mike Labbe

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The process sounds identical, but opposite. Interesting! CNC seems to start with a block of material to take away from it, while 3d starts with nothing and build material up to make something.

We have a RESIN 3d printer also, which is a very different process that uses uv light and a pool of liquid resin.

Printers have become so affordable. The one we have is only $179, and will be less on Black Friday. The newer model is only 20 or 30 more.
 
Last edited:

Rick Hennen

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Jamul, CA 91935
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The process sounds identical, but opposite. Interesting! CNC seems to start with a block of material to take away from it, while 3d starts with nothing and build material up to make something.

We have a RESIN 3d printer also, which is a very different process that uses uv light and a pool of liquid resin.

Printers have become so affordable. The one we have is only $179, and will be less on Black Friday. The newer model is only 20 or 30 more.
Yea, I mentioned that exact concept in another posting on the grumble. They appear to be similar but reverse processes. One removes material while the other adds. In CNC we have to tell the machine which router bit we are using, whether we want the bit to cut inside the vector, on the vector or outside the vector and how deep we want it to cut. In 3D printing you have somewhat similar requirements like filament size, material and temperature. The big difference I see is the efficiency when using either machine for a production project. An acceptable CNC machine with cutting capabilities of 60" x 96"and a vacuum hold down system could run about $35,000.00. I am interested in 3D printing to create prototypes which would then be adapted to other production methods for market. Thanks for your help. I hope you don't mind my picking your brain.
 
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