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happycamper
February 18th, 2009, 08:49 PM
I have 3 Sand Dollars to mount into a customer supplied Ikea shawdow box Frame. What do you suggest to use to mount them? They will each be in a separate opening, on green bainbridge matboard, with a spacer holding the glass off the objects.

CAframer
February 18th, 2009, 09:07 PM
From the archives:

http://thegrumble.com/showthread.php?t=16894&highlight=sand+dollar+mount

http://thegrumble.com/showthread.php?t=14189&highlight=sand+dollar+mount

nikfrz
February 18th, 2009, 09:28 PM
Ive always used blobs of hot glue.

Hanzrobo
February 19th, 2009, 01:23 AM
Sand dollars are worthless. Use hot glue. It will take 10 seconds.
You can mark out your placement with magic tape so you don't make a mistake. You will not be able to remove the hot glue without breaking the sand dollar. Be careful.

Thedra
February 19th, 2009, 10:42 AM
The sand dollar is worthless unless the customer picked it up on the beach on vacation with their father who has since passed away.
The tulle or stabilex still sound the best.


Tom

Bob Doyle
February 19th, 2009, 11:03 AM
I've sewn them down. Running the monofilament through the existing "holes" in the sand dollars.

Jim Miller
February 19th, 2009, 01:58 PM
Yes, sand dollars are plentiful and not usually collectible. In this case the benefit of mounting with fine mesh fabric is as much practical as it is preservative.

Glue spots or lashing by threads would provide support at isolated points, but the stress of an impact during transport or handling could rip away the mounts and/or break the sand dollar.

Again, value may be a non-issue, but a sturdy mount that gives the fragile item overall support would provide the best protection against potential breakage. If glue or thread mounts fail, or if the sand dollar breaks due to the limited support of mounting at certain points, you might be asked to reopen the frame and remount or replace a broken sand dollar.

It is easy to avoid that eventuality with a tulle overlay mount. I would cut a matboard disk slightly larger than the sand dollar's shape and position the sand dollar on it, then wrap with tulle, and attach the fabric edges to the bottom of the disk by hotmelt glue or by sticking it to the 'hook' part of Velcro. This is a 5-minute mount, folks.

The mounted sand dollar may then be float-mounted to a background by gluing the disk. Elevate it with a layer or two of undersized foam board spacers for visual enhancement.

Rick Granick
February 19th, 2009, 02:24 PM
How would this method be varied for a starfish? In my experience, where there are sand dollars there are starfish. ;)
:kaffeetrinker_2: Rick

shayla
June 6th, 2010, 02:03 AM
This is an older thread, but I found it while searching, so will add
this question to it. I'm curious about framing a starfish, too. How
long do they have to be dry before they're really dry? I know that's
a bit of a daft question, but I'll leave it as is. Secondly, if someone
is just framing it to be decorative for a few years, does something
like silicone work to attach it to the backing? Or would that eat
through the starfish shell? I'm guessing not, but just checking.

JWB9999999
June 6th, 2010, 04:16 AM
This is an older thread, but I found it while searching, so will add
this question to it. I'm curious about framing a starfish, too. How
long do they have to be dry before they're really dry? I know that's
a bit of a daft question, but I'll leave it as is. Secondly, if someone
is just framing it to be decorative for a few years, does something
like silicone work to attach it to the backing? Or would that eat
through the starfish shell? I'm guessing not, but just checking.

Silicone is inert, though other chemicals in it may not be. I wouldn't think it would damage the starfish.

FramerDave
June 6th, 2010, 10:40 AM
Sand dollars are worthless. Use hot glue. It will take 10 seconds.
You can mark out your placement with magic tape so you don't make a mistake. You will not be able to remove the hot glue without breaking the sand dollar. Be careful.

Worthless until the next framer breaks it trying to remove it when the customer wants to update the framing. Second to last paragraph. (http://decormagazine.com/2010/05/03/davids-discussion-always-think-of-the-next-guy/)



Silicone is inert, though other chemicals in it may not be. I wouldn't think it would damage the starfish.

Silica might be inert, but silicone adhesive is anything but. Silicone adhesive used to mount seashells will cause a chemical reaction which will destroy the shells. I'm not sure it will have the same effect on a starfish, but there are plenty of other known drawbacks to silicone that should cause framers to shy away from its use.

JWB9999999
June 6th, 2010, 02:42 PM
I've got 6 sanddollars to mount right now, myself. I'll be using a PH neutral adhesive glue on them. I believe it's water soluable as well.


Silica might be inert, but silicone adhesive is anything but. Silicone adhesive used to mount seashells will cause a chemical reaction which will destroy the shells.

Not just silica, but silicone itself is inert. There are, of course, many ways silicone is used, and it's often combined with other chemicals which may well be re-active. When I googled it, I could only find that silicone adhesive was described as "largely inert"... which is very vague. It's certainly possible that whatever reactives a particular silicon adhesive has in it will re-act agressively with some particular substance. But how to know which?

I don't use the stuff myself except to seal cracks in my house. ;)

CAframer
June 6th, 2010, 03:08 PM
The concern with shells is using anything that is acid generating e.g. PVA, or acid cure silicone. It is unclear to me as to whether neutral cure silicone wholly eliminates or merely reduces the generation of acetic acid. If an adhesive is the chosen method for attachment why not avoid the risk by using an alternative e.g. epoxy

FramerDave
June 6th, 2010, 03:33 PM
The thing is, we're not talking about silicone. We're talking about silicone adhesive, with acetic acid and who-knows-what else in it. Aside from that, even with neutral cure silicone adhesive, just how easily reversible do you suppose it is?

GhostFramer
June 6th, 2010, 07:56 PM
My biggest trouble when mounting a starfish is getting it to hold still. :p

shayla
June 7th, 2010, 02:42 AM
Thanks for the smile, Nick. It helps if the starfish is willing. :p

Thanks for your comments, guys. I have a friend who
mentioned having a starfish to frame , and it set me to wondering.
I remembered that seashells can be dissolved by the water in
aquariums, and since starfish bodies are (maybe?) made of
similar stuff, wondered about how they would react. I suppose
if one was of utmost and irreplaceable preciousness, formed
rod mounts could be used.

preservator
June 7th, 2010, 07:37 AM
Sea Shells are made of calcium carbonate which if quite vulnerable to any acid. In museum drawers the dissolution of shells by wood acids is called "Bin's" disease.
Materials used with shells should be acid and lignin-free and all adhesives should be electircal grade, meaning they are formulated for use with copper and silver.



Hugh

shayla
June 8th, 2010, 02:25 AM
Thank you for your comments, all.
I really appreciate them.

CB Art & Framing
June 8th, 2010, 02:31 AM
This may be a little off topic, but I helped my daughter wash her Hermit Crab today. We let him out for a "walk". I learned 2 things about Hermit Crabs.
#1 They can move pretty fast.
#2 When out of it's shell, it looks more like a large shrimp, than a crab.

Also, I never use hot glue. It just does not stick. I have had great results with Corner Weld though.

JWB9999999
June 8th, 2010, 12:40 PM
I don't like hot glue either because it gets REALLY hot down here (weather-wise) and there's a risk the glue won't hold in the heat.